A

Letter A: Displaying 1 - 20 of 2494

(an ending for transitive verbs)

(an indicator of indefiniteness)

older brother of a female

ending that makes a noun into a verb

you (plural), 2nd person object, prefix of verbs

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 210.

Orthographic Variants: 
ami

a defective preterit agentive serving as a base for "quēn" in "quēnamî"

one who (or the thing that) performs the action of the verb (a nominal suffix)

soul (usually given with a possessor prefix)
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 211.

Orthographic Variants: 
-āpan

on or at the waters of (a locative suffix found on place names where there is a canal, river)
Gordon Whittaker, Deciphering Aztec Hieroglyphs, 2021, 104

refers to someone's possessions, things that pertain to him or her; loosely, property

James Lockhart, The Nahuas after the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth through Eighteenth Centuries (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1992), 153.

imperfect ending

an instrument of some kind; tool; means of achieving

Orthographic Variants: 
ala calle, alacalle

the streets (Notice how this is an entire phrase made into one word that, in meaning, ignores the imbedded preposition and article.)

Orthographic Variants: 
ala carcel, alacarcel, a la carcel

in prison (Notice how this is an entire phrase made into one word that, in meaning, ignores the imbedded preposition and article. The "a la" did not mean "to the" for the Nahuas; the "a la" became fused with the noun. Other examples are "a la calle" and "a la China." Please note, too, that accents are rare in Nahuatl, whereas cárcel would be accented today in Spanish.)

Orthographic Variants: 
alachina, ala china, a la china, a la China, ala China, allachina

China; in China; from China; or, (ditto) the Philippines; or, (ditto) the Orient; or, having to do with Asia (Notice how this is an entire phrase made into one word that, in meaning, ignores the imbedded preposition and article.)

Orthographic Variants: 
prorida, Florida, alaflorida, ala florida, ala Florida, alaFlorida, alaForida

a Spanish colony, La Florida

Orthographic Variants: 
alahuerta, alauertan, alahuērtah, ala huerta

orchard; or, an intensively cultivated garden (one example specifically mentions growing flowers in the huerta)
James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 210.

Orthographic Variants: 
a la Velacruz

Veracruz, in or at Veracruz