J

Letter J: Displaying 1 - 20 of 35

"Jacobite," a European name, taken by some Nahuas; e.g. Martín Jacobita was one of the literate trilingual Nahuas who participated in the composition of the Florentine Codex

See Sell's comments in Bartolomé de Alva, A Guide to Confession Large and Small in the Mexican Language, 1634, eds. Barry D. Sell and John Frederick Schwaller, with Lu Ann Homza (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1999), 28.

Orthographic Variants: 
xalma

a kind of packsaddle (could be put on a person as a kind of punishment)
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
Sepon, Sebon, Jabun, xapon, Jabon, Jabunti

Japan
(a loanword from Spanish)

Japanese, a Japanese person
(a loanword from Spanish)

Here in This Year: Seventeenth-Century Nahuatl Annals of the Tlaxcala-Puebla Valley, ed. and transl. Camilla Townsend, with an essay by James Lockhart (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010), 88–89.

a pitcher for liquids
(a loanword from Spanish)

a piece of coarse cloth
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, 1613)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 234–235.

Orthographic Variants: 
gerusallem, jelosalen, hierusalem, jierusalem, jerusalem

Jerusalem (a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
iesucristo

Jesus Christ; this loanword is common in colonial Nahuatl. Alva's guide to confession uses it 16 times out of 260 total loanword appearances of various kinds. The percentages of appearances of certain loans in Alva are very consistent with Chimalpahin, who also wrote in the seventeenth century. See Sell's comments in Bartolomé de Alva, A Guide to Confession Large and Small in the Mexican Language, 1634, eds. Barry D. Sell and John Frederick Schwaller, with Lu Ann Homza (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1999), 23.

Orthographic Variants: 
Jesus, Iesvs, Iesv Christo, Iesus, Jesos, Hueçuz, Huesus

Jesus Christ
(a loanword from Spanish)

a Spanish surname; one famous person of this name was don Francisco Jiménez, the indigenous "juez gobernador" of Tenochtitlan, a native of Tecamachalco, who was active in the second half of the sixteenth century

(ca. 1582, México)
Luis Reyes García, ¿Como te confundes? ¿Acaso no somos conquistados? Anales de Juan Bautista (Mexico: Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, Biblioteca Lorenzo Boturini Insigne y Nacional Basílica de Guadalupe, 2001), 179, note 67.

Orthographic Variants: 
Josefa, Xosepa

a Spanish given name for a female

Orthographic Variants: 
jobileo

plenary indulgence, a type of Christian blessing (see attestations)

Judas, the name, and a biblical figure, Judas Iscariot, who betrayed Jesus for 30 silver coins (central Mexico, late sixteenth century; originally from Sahagún in 1574, a document that Chimalpahin copied)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 178–179.

Judea, a place name (central Mexico, late sixteenth century; originally from Sahagún in 1574, a document that Chimalpahin copied)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 152–153.

Orthographic Variants: 
jotiyo, xotiotin

a Jew
(a loanword from Spanish)

Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 76–77.

Orthographic Variants: 
juebes, juepes

Thursday
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
gobernador juez, juez governador, juez gouernador

a municipal governor, the same as gobernador (a loanword from Spanish)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 248.

also, a term seen for an investigating indigenous judge (also called a juez de residencia); this could be a rotating post given to various elite men who traveled in the central areas to adjudicate disputes in the sixteenth century
Charles Gibson, The Aztecs under Spanish Rule (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1964), 169.

Orthographic Variants: 
iuez, jues, juezesme, Juezotl, tlacajues, juezes, jueztin, juestin

judge; could also be combined with gobernador for judge-governor (a loanword from Spanish); this was a term used for both indigenous and Spanish officials; in the sixteenth century many an indigenous "juez" was sent to help resolve issues in numerous indigenous communities

trial, judgment
(a loanword from Spanish)

July
(a loanword from Spanish)