F

Letter F: Displaying 1 - 20 of 47
letter “f”.

factory; also, a name for a tax
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
fator

an official of the royal treasury; also, a mercantile or company agent in the sixteenth century, prevalent in the early phases of colonization in the Americas
Matthew Restall and Florine Asselbergs, Invading Guatemala (2007), 113.

a type of door made with wire and sticks.
Orthographic Variants: 
aneca, hanega, ahneca, caneca, anega, faneca

a Spanish dry measure, the equivalent of a bushel and a half; also used as a measure of land (a loanword from Spanish) a grain measure and a land measure (that portion of grain required for sowing a certain plot of land) Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 26.

faith
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
hebrero, hefrero, febrelo, fefrero, feferro, feprero

February
(a loanword from Spanish)

a male person's name, a loanword from Spanish

Orthographic Variants: 
Feliciz

a personal name introduced by Europeans and taken by some indigenous men; interesting for its orthographic variations when written in Nahuatl (which may also convey pronunciation differences)

surnames of an archbishop in Mexico, don Alonso Fernández de Bonilla

(central Mexico, 1614)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 282–283.

bail
(a loanword from Spanish)

1. disobedient persona. 2. ugly. 3. dirty.
1. disobedient persona. 2. ugly. 3. dirty.
# 1. No es bonito. “Aquel hombre no es hermoso porque tiene muchas cicatrices”. 2. socio. “Aquel agua está muy socio porque han lavado en ella”.

figure
(a loanword from Spanish)

philosophy
(a loanword from Spanish)

Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain; Book 6 -- Rhetoric and Moral Philosophy, No. 14, Part 7, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. Dibble (Santa Fe and Salt Lake City: School of American Research and the University of Utah, 1961), 1.

a philosopher (see attestations)
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
pilma, pilman, firman, filma, frma, pirma

signature; often a rubric
(a loanword from Spanish)

to sign or apply one’s fingerprint on s.o.’s document.
# ni. Una persona escribe su nombre de otro en el papel. “Alejandro le firman el papel de su hijo lo que le piden en la escuela”.
Orthographic Variants: 
firmarohua

to sign, add a signature
(from firmar, a Spanish loanword)

Frances Karttunen and James Lockhart, Nahuatl in the Middle Years: Language Contact Phenomena in Texts of the Colonial Period, Linguistics 85 (Los Angeles, University of California Publications, 1976), 32.