S

Letter S: Displaying 1 - 20 of 82
Orthographic Variants: 
sabato, xapato, sabbatho, sabado, sabao

Saturday
(a loanword from Spanish)

a bed sheet
(a loanword from Spanish)

altar cloth
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
sacapuch

a sackbut, a horn instrument introduced by Europeans, a forerunner of the slide trombone
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
saserdotis

priest
(a loanword from Spanish)

jacket
(a loanword rom Spanish)

a religious term loaned from Latin to Spanish and to Nahuatl, referring to the Crown (real magestad)

sacrament
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
sachristan

a person who works in the church
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
sachristia

sacristy
(a loanword from Spanish)

Sagittarius, a zodiac sign
(a loanword from Spanish/Latin)

(central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 128–129.

Orthographic Variants: 
satsittarios

sagittarius, a sign of the zodiac; actually, originally a loanword from Latin, although possibly similar in siixteenth-century Spanish; see Lori Boornazian Diel, The Codex Mexicanus: A Guide to Life in Late-Sixteenth-Century New Spain (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018), 173.

Orthographic Variants: 
sacrario

a sanctuary, a part of a church

the last name of a friar, Bernardino de Sahagún, who worked with Nahuas to capture information about pre-contact Nahua society

hall, room
(a loanword from Spanish)

a place name and a surname; e.g. doctor Juan de Salamanca, vicar general for the Spaniards and a choirmaster in Mexico City, a criollo, who passed away in 1615

(central Mexico, 1615)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 262–263, 302–303.

Orthographic Variants: 
Salasal

a Spanish surname, taken by indigenous people, too; e.g. don Hernando de Salazar was the indigenous municipal governor in 1563 in Tlaxcala; the title "don" is inconsistent until this point, when he became governor

Here in This Year: Seventeenth-Century Nahuatl Annals of the Tlaxcala-Puebla Valley, ed. and transl. Camilla Townsend, with an essay by James Lockhart (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010), 166–167.

Orthographic Variants: 
Buenapentora

St. Bonaventure; a name taken by some Nahuas, such as Pedro de San Buenaventura, who was one of the literate trilingual Nahuas who participated in the composition of the Florentine Codex
See Sell's comments in Bartolomé de Alva, A Guide to Confession Large and Small in the Mexican Language, 1634, eds. Barry D. Sell and John Frederick Schwaller, with Lu Ann Homza (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1999), 28.

San Buenaventura was also, of course, the patron saint taken by some indigenous communities, and added to the indigenous place name.

a personal name, such as we see held by a don Martín de San Juan in the Mexico City area in 1564; a name such as this would, later in the Spanish colonial period, sometimes be shortened to just Juan, resulting in a name such as Martín Juan; but this phenomenon of two first names was more likely for those who did not have the honorific title don

San Juan was also a popular saint's name that became attached to indigenous communities.