Spanish Loanwords

Displaying 1 - 30 of 1305

soul (usually given with a possessor prefix)
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 211.

dragonfly (partially a loanword from Spanish, from avión, airplane)

http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/nahuat-l/2014-June/005703.html

abbess (see attestions)
(a loanword from Spanish)

to embrace, hug
(based on the loanword from Spanish, abrazar, to embrace, hug)

Fernando Horcasitas found this form was used in the language of dances that were recorded in various pueblos by ethnographers. (twentieth century)
Fernando Horcasitas, "La Danza de los Tecuanes," Estudios de Cultura Náhuatl 14 (1980), 239–286, see especially p. 257.

April
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
açeite

oil
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
azetonas, axitonax

olive(s) (a loanword from Spanish)

minutes, proceedings of some constituted body (a word probably not used by sixteenth-century Tlaxcalans)
(a loanword from Spanish)

The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

Orthographic Variants: 
aqualliyos, aquaioyos, aquariyos

aquarius, a sign of the zodiac; actually, originally a loanword from Latin, although possibly similar in siixteenth-century Spanish; see Lori Boornazian Diel, The Codex Mexicanus: A Guide to Life in Late-Sixteenth-Century New Spain (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018), 172.

Orthographic Variants: 
aquario

Aquarius, a sign of the zodiac; Chimalpahin included this in his reckoning of the intersection of the Aztec and Christian calendars (central Mexico, seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 120–121 and 128–129.

Orthographic Variants: 
Adam

Adam

Louise M. Burkhart, Before Guadalupe: The Virgin Mary in Early Colonial Nahuatl Literature, Institute for Mesoamerican Studies Monograph 13 (Albany: University at Albany, 2001), 17.

Orthographic Variants: 
acnos tey

Lamb of God
(a phrase from Latin)

Orthographic Variants: 
agusto, augustus, augusto

August
(a loanword from Spanish)

August (month)

Orthographic Variants: 
alauertan, alahuērtah

orchard; or, an intensively cultivated garden (one example specifically mentions growing flowers in the huerta)
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 210.

an alb, a white linen tunic worn over a habit
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
albasea, albansea, albasia, alfasea, aluacia, aluacia

executor of a will
(a loanword from Spanish)

a fruit
(a loanword from Spanish, but originally from Arabic)

Orthographic Variants: 
algaite, alcayde

jailor
(a loanword from Spanish)

Frances Karttunen and James Lockhart, Nahuatl in the Middle Years: Language Contact Phenomena in Texts of the Colonial Period, Linguistics 85 (Los Angeles, University of California Publications, 1976), 54.

highest magistrate of a district, often equivalent to "corregidor" and usually held by a Spanish colonial official
(a loanword from Spanish)

The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

full wording for "alcalde"
(a loanword from Spanish)

The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

Orthographic Variants: 
algalde, alcalte

a first-instance judge attached to a local municipal government
(a loanword from Spanish); this was a term used for both indigenous and Spanish officials

Caterina Pizzigoni, Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2007), 248.

the office of the alcalde, a member of the municipal council
(partly a loanword from Spanish, with the -yotl ending from Nahuatl)

(ca. 1582, Mexico City)
Luis Reyes García, ¿Como te confundes? ¿Acaso no somos conquistados? Anales de Juan Bautista (Mexico: Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, Biblioteca Lorenzo Boturini Insigne y Nacional Basílica de Guadalupe, 2001), 136–137.

Orthographic Variants: 
Alimania

Germany
(a loanword from Spanish)

a type of sable, short and curved, with a sharp edge only on one side, except at the point
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
alguazil, alguaçil, alhuacil, alhuaçil, arguazil, alhuasil

constable, a sub-cabildo officer
(a loanword from Spanish)

The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

food
(a loanword from Spanish)

horse-riding apparatus
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
almoada, almohuada

pillow
(a loanword from Spanish)

auction
(a loanword from Spanish)