Spanish Loanwords | F

Letter F: Displaying 1 - 20 of 29

factory; also, a name for a tax
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
fator

an official of the royal treasury; also, a mercantile or company agent in the sixteenth century, prevalent in the early phases of colonization in the Americas
Matthew Restall and Florine Asselbergs, Invading Guatemala (2007), 113.

Orthographic Variants: 
aneca, hanega, ahneca, caneca, anega, faneca

a Spanish dry measure, the equivalent of a bushel and a half; also used as a measure of land (a loanword from Spanish) a grain measure and a land measure (that portion of grain required for sowing a certain plot of land) Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 26.

faith
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
hebrero, hefrero, febrelo, fefrero, feferro, feprero

February
(a loanword from Spanish)

a male person's name, a loanword from Spanish

surnames of an archbishop in Mexico, don Alonso Fernández de Bonilla

(central Mexico, 1614)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 282–283.

bail
(a loanword from Spanish)

figure
(a loanword from Spanish)

philosophy
(a loanword from Spanish)

Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain; Book 6 -- Rhetoric and Moral Philosophy, No. 14, Part 7, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. Dibble (Santa Fe and Salt Lake City: School of American Research and the University of Utah, 1961), 1.

Orthographic Variants: 
pilma, pilman, firman, filma, frma, pirma

signature; often a rubric
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
firmarohua

to sign, add a signature
(from firmar, a Spanish loanword)

Frances Karttunen and James Lockhart, Nahuatl in the Middle Years: Language Contact Phenomena in Texts of the Colonial Period, Linguistics 85 (Los Angeles, University of California Publications, 1976), 32.

Orthographic Variants: 
firmayotia, firmatiya, filmatia

to sign, to make a signature
(based on the Spanish loanword, firma, signature)

James Lockhart and Frances Karttunen, Nahuatl in the Middle Years (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1976), 134.

sign something, make a rubric on it
(from firmar, a Spanish loanword)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 217.

Orthographic Variants: 
pixcal, viscal, biscal

among indigenous people, church steward, the highest of all indigenous church-related officials; also a term used for Spanish officials, who represent the government or a specific branch of the government in legal matters somewhat like a prosecuting attorney
The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

Orthographic Variants: 
Frores

a Spanish last name, but it could also be taken by indigenous people; e.g. don Antonio Flores, municipal governor of Tlaxcala in 1565

Here in This Year: Seventeenth-Century Nahuatl Annals of the Tlaxcala-Puebla Valley, ed. and transl. Camilla Townsend, with an essay by James Lockhart (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010), 166–167.

Orthographic Variants: 
prorida

a Spanish colony, La Florida

Orthographic Variants: 
forçados

people forced into exile
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, 1613)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 236–237.

France
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, 1614)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 280–281.

French people, people of France, people from France (partly a loanword from Spanish) (ca. 1582, Mexico City) Luis Reyes García, ¿Como te confundes? ¿Acaso no somos conquistados? Anales de Juan Bautista (Mexico: Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, Biblioteca Lorenzo Boturini Insigne y Nacional Basílica de Guadalupe, 2001), 174–175.