S

Letter S: Displaying 1 - 20 of 69
Orthographic Variants: 
sabato, xapato, sabbatho, sabado, sabao

Saturday
(a loanword from Spanish)

a bed sheet
(a loanword from Spanish)

altar cloth
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
sacapuch

a sackbut, a horn instrument introduced by Europeans, a forerunner of the slide trombone
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
saserdotis

priest
(a loanword from Spanish)

jacket
(a loanword rom Spanish)

a religious term loaned from Latin to Spanish and to Nahuatl, referring to the Crown (real magestad)

sacrament
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
sachristan

a person who works in the church
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
sachristia

sacristy
(a loanword from Spanish)

Sagittarius, a zodiac sign
(a loanword from Spanish/Latin)

(central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 128–129.

Orthographic Variants: 
satsittarios

sagittarius, a sign of the zodiac; actually, originally a loanword from Latin, although possibly similar in siixteenth-century Spanish; see Lori Boornazian Diel, The Codex Mexicanus: A Guide to Life in Late-Sixteenth-Century New Spain (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018), 173.

Orthographic Variants: 
sacrario

a sanctuary, a part of a church

hall, room
(a loanword from Spanish)

a place name and a surname; e.g. doctor Juan de Salamanca, vicar general for the Spaniards and a choirmaster in Mexico City, a criollo, who passed away in 1615

(central Mexico, 1615)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 262–263, 302–303.

Orthographic Variants: 
Salasal

a Spanish surname, taken by indigenous people, too; e.g. don Hernando de Salazar was the indigenous municipal governor in 1563 in Tlaxcala; the title "don" is inconsistent until this point, when he became governor

Here in This Year: Seventeenth-Century Nahuatl Annals of the Tlaxcala-Puebla Valley, ed. and transl. Camilla Townsend, with an essay by James Lockhart (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010), 166–167.

a Spanish surname

Orthographic Variants: 
Sanctoval, Sanctoual

a Spanish surname; taken by indigenous people in the sixteenth century and onward

blood
(a loanword from Spanish)