Spanish Loanwords | C / CH

Letter C/CH: Displaying 1 - 20 of 282
Orthographic Variants: 
c

the Roman numeral for 100, a loan

(sixteenth century, Quauhtinchan)
Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca, eds. Paul Kirchhoff, Lina Odena Güemes, y Luis Reyes García (México: CISINAH, INAH-SEP, 1976), 173.

a considerable piece of land, intended to hold 12 fanegas of seed and measure 552 by 1104 varas (Spanish yards) or 609,408 square varas, could also be divided into four suertes
(a loanword from Spanish)

John Roy Reasonover, Land Measures (1946).

a place where horses or other beasts of burden are raised
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 212.

(a Spanish) gentleman, horseman, or a knight of a military order
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
cauallo cactlaça

to remove horseshoes
(partially a loanword from Spanish, caballo, horse)

Orthographic Variants: 
cauallo, cavallo, cabayo, cavayo, cahuayo, cauaio, cabalyo, cabalio, cahualo, cabalon, caoallo

horse (a loanword from Spanish)
James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 212.

Orthographic Variants: 
cauecera, capisela, cabeseran, cabeçerra, cafecela, cabicera, capicelas, cabiçera, cabiçera

head town of a district
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 212.

Orthographic Variants: 
cabirdo, capilton, capildo, cauildo, capilto, cauilto, cavildo

municipal council
The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

goat
(a loanword from Spanish)

a female cacique, or indigenous elite
(a loanword from Spanish that came originally from the Caribbean, from Taíno)

a cacique's entailed estate
(a loanword from Spanish; but the term cacique originally came from Taíno in the Caribbean)

a word used by Spaniards for an indigenous ruler; tlatoani
(a loanword from Spanish, and before that, from Taíno)

The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

chain
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
cauallo

a horse
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 212.

Orthographic Variants: 
casja, casa, caga, caxa, caxas, caza, gaja

chest, box, coffin, tomb; could also serve as a drum (a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
calis

a chalice, a sacred vessel in the form of a cup, which is used for consecrating the wine for masses in the Catholic church
(a loanword from Spanish, el cáliz)

street
(a loanword from Spanish)

hosier
(partly a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
calças totochcopina

to take the socks (stockings, hose) off another, especially roughly (?)

to take the stockings (socks, hose) off of someone
(partly a loanword from Spanish)