Spanish Loanwords | T

Letter T: Displaying 1 - 20 of 75

a wooden board
(a loanword from Spanish)

(ca. 1582, Mexico City)
Luis Reyes García, ¿Como te confundes? ¿Acaso no somos conquistados? Anales de Juan Bautista (Mexico: Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, Biblioteca Lorenzo Boturini Insigne y Nacional Basílica de Guadalupe, 2001), 198–198.

Orthographic Variants: 
tapetan, tafedan, tabetan

taffeta (a type of fabric)
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
tabul

a drum
(a loanword from Spanish)

a fife, a musical instrument (see attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
tanxacio, tasancio

tribute assessment, assignment of quotas
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
taça, tanza

a cup; see tāçah (a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 232.

someone's soul
(contains a loanword from Spanish)

Susanne Klaus, Uprooted Christianity: The Preaching of the Christian Doctrine in Mexico, Based on Franciscan Sermons of the 16th Century Written in Nahuatl (Bonn: Bonner Amerikanistische Studien e. V. c/o Seminar für Völkerkunde, Universität Bonn, 1999), 247.

Orthographic Variants: 
tiatinos, deatinostin

a "revival" order, often connected with Jesuits in name if not in fact; had some missions
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
tienpos, dienpo

tempo (musical term)(this is a loanword from Latin and Spanish) (see attestations)

pliers, nippers, clamp(s)
(a loanword from Spanish)

lieutenant, deputy; in Tlaxcala, a law officer in outlying districts outranking a constable (alguacil) or merino
(a loanword from Spanish)

The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 154.

a golden crown (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, corona, crown)

Orthographic Variants: 
theologia

theology
(a loanword from Spanish)

(early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 206–207.

divinity, the sacred combined with the Spanish loanword, Dios (God), equates to the Christian god
Stafford Poole, C.M., "Christian Terms in Nahuatl," n.p., n.d.

Orthographic Variants: 
tepuz quarto, tepuzquarto, tepoz quarto

a quarter, a known type of money in the sixteenth century (see Molina) (partly a loanword from Spanish)

the third
(a loanword from Spanish)

one third
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
dermino

deadline for doing something, term within which something must be done
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 234.

early on, a laborer attached to land worked for the support of indigenous nobles, part of an encomienda or right to extract labor as a kind of tribute system; later, an agricultural laborer on a rented parcel or a sharecropper
(a loanword from Spanish)