Spanish Loanwords

Displaying 241 - 270 of 1315

Spaniards, literally Castillians
(a loanword from Spanish, Nahuatlized)

kɑʃtilteːkɑtɬ
Orthographic Variants: 
cashtiltecal, caxtiltecantli

Spaniard (from the Spanish word, Castilla, plus the Nahuatl suffix for "person of")
James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 213.

gañanes (hired men, orthographic example comes from Mexico City, 1634)  Frances Karttunen and James Lockhart, Nahuatl in the Middle Years: Language Contact Phenomena in Texts of the Colonial Period, Linguistics 85 (Los Angeles, University of California Publications, 1976), 103.

the leaf of a tree, or an herb with wide leaves

Orthographic Variants: 
sedola

decree
(a loanword from Spanish)

a ham of bacon, or a piece of something, a slice of something, or a large slice of fish (see Molina)
(partially a loanword from Spanish, tocino, bacon)

a brush
(a loanword from Spanish)

stocks, for punishment; a trap
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
sera, çera

wax, candles
(a loanword from Spanish)

a Roman goddess
(a loanword that came from Spanish into Nahuatl)

Orthographic Variants: 
siriyo

a match, a torch
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
Zerón

a name from Spain, taken on by indigenous nobles; don Martín Cerón was a Nahua ruler of Xochimilco Tepetentli who married doña Francisca de Guzmán (another Spanish name borne by indigenous nobility), and from this union was born doña María Cerón (who married don Fernando de la Cerda, her nephew, and from this union was born don Alonso de la Cerda, who was brought up in Xochimilco); don Martín and doña Francisca also had a daughter named doña Francisca, a daughter doña Juana, and a son, also called don Martín Cerón [Piltzintli]

(central Mexico, seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 98–99, 102–103.

lock
(a loanword from Spanish)

a Spanish surname; e.g. don Juan de Cervantes, bishop of Oaxaca

(central Mexico, 1614)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 282–283.

a scepter, or a staff carried by confraternity officers
(a loanword from Spanish)

jacket
(a loanword from Spanish)

a choirmaster
(a loanword from Spanish)

central Mexico, 1613)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 264–265.

a metal sheet
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
chapines chiualoyan

the place where chapines (clogs?) are made (see Molina)

one who makes clogs (?) (if so, partly a loanword from Spanish, chapín, clog) (see Molina)

Orthographic Variants: 
chapineschiua, chapines chihua, chapines chiua

a clog maker (partly a loanword from Spanish, chapín, a clog with a cork sole worn by women)

Orthographic Variants: 
chapines chiuhcan

a place where chapines (some type of shoe, perhaps clogs) are made
(partly a loanword from Spanish, chapín, possibly originally from Arabic, "chipin")

a name, a Spanish surname; it was also taken by indigenous people; e.g. don Hernando de Chávez of Tetzcoco, son of Nezahualpilli

(central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 202–203.

He was serving as governor of Tetzcoco in 1564.

(ca. 1582, México)
Luis Reyes García, ¿Como te confundes? ¿Acaso no somos conquistados? Anales de Juan Bautista (Mexico: Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, Biblioteca Lorenzo Boturini Insigne y Nacional Basílica de Guadalupe, 2001), 226–227.

chile seller (a loanword from Spanish, built upon the Nahuatl word for chile, chilli)

Orthographic Variants: 
a la China, alachina

China, or Asia more generally, including the Philippines
(a loanword from Spanish)

a person of mixed ethnic heritage; or a Chinese person
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
cheremia

a loud single-reed musical instrument
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 248.

a small goat (kid); also seen as chivato
(a loanword from Spanish)

a chocolate maker/seller (female)
(a Nahuatl word with a Hispanized ending)

to pray to God with tears and wailing (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, dios, God)