Spanish Loanwords

Displaying 91 - 120 of 1305
Orthographic Variants: 
pastitor

stretched linen
(a loanword from Spanish)

Juan Buenaventura Zapata y Mendoza, Historia cronológica de la Noble Ciudad de Tlaxcala, transcripción paleográfica, traducción, presentación y notas por Luis Reyes García y Andrea Martínez Baracs (Tlaxcala and Mexico City: Universidad Autónoma de Tlaxcala, Secretaría de Extensión Universitaria y Difusión Cultural, y Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, 1995), 472–473.

Orthographic Variants: 
patan

a fulling mill, a fuller
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 211.

beatification
(a loanword from Spanish)

calf
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
bethlen, bethlem, bethleem

Bethlehem, the place name
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, late sixteenth century; originally from Sahagún in 1574, a document that Chimalpahin copied)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 136–137.

Orthographic Variants: 
vergantin

brigantine, a ship or boat built for use in war (see attestations)

a first name for a boy or man
(a loanword from Spanish)

a stringed musical instrument (see attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
blaquilio

a type of wheat
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
bunete

a bonnet, a biretta, a hat; worn by members of the clergy
(a loanword from Spanish)

(early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 204–205.

Orthographic Variants: 
portado, purtado

embroidered
(a loanword from Spanish)

a tassel
(a loanword from Spanish)

(early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 206–207.

Orthographic Variants: 
vorego, poreco

sheep

boots (a loanword from Spanish)

a pharmacy, a chemist's shop, a drug store
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
buticario

an apothecary, a person who sells or distributes medicines
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
botixa

earthenware jug
(a loanword from Spanish)

a Spanish surname; the name of a Doctor (an probably a high court justice) in sixteenth-century New Spain
(a loanword from Spanish)

a measure; possibly, the distance from the chest to the tip of the fingers of the outstretched arm; but this measurement term was applied to a wide range of indigenous measures, resulting in equivalencies of from 1/2 vara to 3 varas (see Castillo quote in the Spanish attestations field)
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
braçada, brasada

a unit for measuring length, a fathom; sometimes used in place of the indigenous measure quahuitl (stick); also the distance between the hands when the arms were extended (like a braza); a tlalquahuitl or quahuitl may also have been 2.5 varas (or so attested in Azcapotzalco in 1738)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 211.

breviary
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
uouas

pustule (could be related to venereal disease), typically appearing in the plura; or, a swollen gland
(a loanword from Spanish)

ox (a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
bulla

a "bull" (as in papal bull, a major pronouncement from the Pope; or, a bull of indulgence, etc.); people could make donations to the church to assuage their guilt for sins, and this was called a "bula"
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
volto

in the round; often seen as part of a description of a saint's image in testaments
(a loanword from Spanish)

donkey
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
c

the Roman numeral for 100, a loan

(sixteenth century, Quauhtinchan)
Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca, eds. Paul Kirchhoff, Lina Odena Güemes, y Luis Reyes García (México: CISINAH, INAH-SEP, 1976), 173.

a considerable piece of land, intended to hold 12 fanegas of seed and measure 552 by 1104 varas (Spanish yards) or 609,408 square varas, could also be divided into four suertes
(a loanword from Spanish)

John Roy Reasonover, Land Measures (1946).

a place where horses or other beasts of burden are raised
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 212.

(a Spanish) gentleman, horseman, or a knight of a military order
(a loanword from Spanish)