Spanish Loanwords

Displaying 91 - 120 of 1315

sugar (attestations to come)

Orthographic Variants: 
açul, açol, asul

blue (see attestations)

low, of low quality
(a loanword from Spanish)

bullet
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
bargo, barco

a balcony
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
pantera, padera, vandera, vamderra

a flag, a banner
(a loanword from Spanish)

barber-surgeon
(a loanword from Spanish)

ravine
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
parena

an auger, a drill
(a loanword from Spanish)

ward, neighborhood
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
pastitor

stretched linen
(a loanword from Spanish)

Juan Buenaventura Zapata y Mendoza, Historia cronológica de la Noble Ciudad de Tlaxcala, transcripción paleográfica, traducción, presentación y notas por Luis Reyes García y Andrea Martínez Baracs (Tlaxcala and Mexico City: Universidad Autónoma de Tlaxcala, Secretaría de Extensión Universitaria y Difusión Cultural, y Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, 1995), 472–473.

Orthographic Variants: 
patan

a fulling mill, a fuller
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 211.

beatification
(a loanword from Spanish)

calf
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
bethlen, bethlem, bethleem

Bethlehem, the place name
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, late sixteenth century; originally from Sahagún in 1574, a document that Chimalpahin copied)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 136–137.

Orthographic Variants: 
vergantin

brigantine, a ship or boat built for use in war (see attestations)

a first name for a boy or man
(a loanword from Spanish)

a stringed musical instrument (see attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
blaquilio

a type of wheat
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
bunete

a bonnet, a biretta, a hat; worn by members of the clergy
(a loanword from Spanish)

(early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 204–205.

Orthographic Variants: 
portado, purtado

embroidered
(a loanword from Spanish)

a tassel
(a loanword from Spanish)

(early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 206–207.

Orthographic Variants: 
vorego, poreco

sheep

boots (a loanword from Spanish)

a pharmacy, a chemist's shop, a drug store
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
buticario

an apothecary, a person who sells or distributes medicines
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
botixa

earthenware jug
(a loanword from Spanish)

a Spanish surname; the name of a Doctor (an probably a high court justice) in sixteenth-century New Spain
(a loanword from Spanish)

a measure; possibly, the distance from the chest to the tip of the fingers of the outstretched arm; but this measurement term was applied to a wide range of indigenous measures, resulting in equivalencies of from 1/2 vara to 3 varas (see Castillo quote in the Spanish attestations field)
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
braçada, brasada

a unit for measuring length, a fathom; sometimes used in place of the indigenous measure quahuitl (stick); also the distance between the hands when the arms were extended (like a braza); a tlalquahuitl or quahuitl may also have been 2.5 varas (or so attested in Azcapotzalco in 1738)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 211.