a la huerta.

(a loanword from Spanish)

Headword: 
a la huerta.
Principal English Translation: 

orchard; or, an intensively cultivated garden (one example specifically mentions growing flowers in the huerta)
James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 210.

auh yn ompa moyetzticatca a la huerta sant cosme sant damian matlacxihuitl omey yhua chicontetl metztli yn oncan yc hualmiquanitzinoqueh yancuic teopan St. Diego. huehuecalco. = “They were at the garden of San Cosme and San Damián for thirteen years and seven months, from where they moved to the new church of San Diego in Huehuecalco” (Chimalpahin 2006: 50).
[annals (AHT, ZM); time range: 1594–1681]
Loans in Colonial and Modern Nahuatl, eds. Agnieszka Brylak, Julia Madajczak, Justyna Olko, and John Sullivan, Trends in Linguistics Documentation 35, ed. Volker Gast (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2020), 62.

Domingo yc xix. de octubre de 1603 aos. yn tlaçocihuapilli, yn monextitzino atiçapan yquac quimocahuillito, yn ompa a la huerta Sant cosme. Sant. Damian. = “Sunday the 19th of October of the year 1603 was when they went to deliver the precious lady [the Virgin] who appeared at Atiçapan to the orchard of San Cosme and San Damián” (Chimalpahin 2006: 76).
[annals (AHT, ZM); time range: 1594–1681]
Loans in Colonial and Modern Nahuatl, eds. Agnieszka Brylak, Julia Madajczak, Justyna Olko, and John Sullivan, Trends in Linguistics Documentation 35, ed. Volker Gast (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2020), 62.

oquitocaque tech a la huerta yca yn estanque ypan Pasqua (Zapata y Mendoza 1995: 588). = They buried him right next to the garden by a pool, during Easter.
[annals (AHT, ZM); time range: 1594–1681]
Loans in Colonial and Modern Nahuatl, eds. Agnieszka Brylak, Julia Madajczak, Justyna Olko, and John Sullivan, Trends in Linguistics Documentation 35, ed. Volker Gast (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2020), 62.

Orthographic Variants: 
alahuerta, alauertan, alahuērtah, ala huerta
Lockhart’s Nahuatl as Written: 

alahuērtah = orchard, intensively cultivated garden, Sp. huerta
James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 210.

Attestations from sources in English: 

Notice how this is an entire phrase made into one word that, in meaning, ignores the imbedded preposition and article.

Chimaliztacan alauertan = an orchard at Chimaliztaca;
atlauhcamilpan alauertan = an orchard at Atlauhcamilpan (Coyoacan, circa 1550)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 26:5, 160–161.

nicnomaquilitiuh alahuerta yn onca onoc xocoquauhtzintli = I am giving her the orchard where there are fruit trees. (San Bartolomé Atenco, Coyoacan, 1617)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 3, p. 61.

tlali alahuerta moconponeroa de quinse baras y uno qta yc patlahuac = orchard land composed of fifteen and a quarter varas wide
Leslie S. Offutt, "Levels of Acculturation in Northeastern New Spain; San Esteban Testaments of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries," Estudios de Cultura Náhuatl 22 (1992), 409–443, see page 440–441.

Attestations from sources in Spanish: 

nicpie a la huerta ca nicmacatiuh ynochpoch Juana Agustina aço oncan quitocazque xochitzintli = que dejo por mis bienes una huerta, la cual dejo a mi hija Juana Augustina para que siembre flores (Tlatelolco, 1609)
Vidas y bienes olvidados: Testamentos en náhuatl y castellano del siglo XVII, vol. 3, Teresa Rojas Rabiela, et al, eds. (México: CIESAS, 2002), 70–73.