Spanish Loanwords

Displaying 31 - 60 of 1305
Orthographic Variants: 
almo

a Spanish dry measure, one-twelfth of a fanega, typically used to explain how much land can be planted in this quantify of seed
The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 15; and see Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 26.

Orthographic Variants: 
artar, altal

altar, whether in a church, or in a home
(a loanword from Spanish)

don Diego de Alvarado Huanitzin, son of Tezozomoctli Aculhnahuacatzintli (a lord of Tenochtitlan) and Tlacuilolxochtzin (daughter of Matlaccoatzin of Ecatepec); don Diego had a son ("with a noblewoman") and the son was named don Miguel Oquiztzin; he had another son named don Miguel Chalchiuhquiyauhtzin, born in Ecatepec; such a genealogy links pre-contact with Spanish colonial times.

(central Mexico, seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 100–101.

a Spanish surname; introduced by earlier invaders, such as Pedro de Alvarado Contreras and Jorge de Alvarado y Contreras; also a name taken by figures in the indigenous elite, e.g. don Jorge Alvarado of Tetzcoco

(central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 186–187.

Orthographic Variants: 
alhuexo

a plant native to Spain; also called almorta
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
ame

Amen
(a loanword from Spanish)

an amice, an undervestment worn around the neck and shoulders by a bishop
(a loanword from Spanish)

(early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 206–207.

love
(a loanword from Spanish)

protection in one's possession, e.g. of property
(a loanword from Spanish)

a litter, a carrier for religious processions (a loanword from Spanish)

a carrying platform
(a loanword from Spanish)

Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 80–81. (1604, central Mexico)

a name, a Spanish surname, which could also be taken by indigenous individuals; e.g. don Francisco de Andrada, who is quoted twice as speaking in the first person in part of the Codex Chimalpahin, and so possibly authored part of the material included in the Tetzcocan accounts of the Spanish conquest period; so, he was possibly a Nahua chronicler/local historian; affiliated with Tetzcoco and seemingly a son of Nezahualpilli (central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 200–203.

a variant of fanega, a grain measure
(a loanword from Spanish)

an angel (see attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
ageles, agele

Angeles, a Christian name associated with the Virgin Mary and taken by some indigenous women upon baptism; also used as a second name or something like a surname (e.g. de los Angeles) by indigenous men and women; also, a place name (e.g. Los Angeles) (see attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
-anima, animan

soul
(a loanword from Spanish, usually possessed in Nahuatl)

year
(a loanword from Spanish)

before, in front of (an official)
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
anzaron

a metal tool for working the soil, often equated with tlaltepoztli

to appear, as in a saint making an apparition to the faithful (see attestations)
(a loanword from Spanish)

an appeal
(a loanword from Spanish, apelación) (see Molina)

a legal appeal (see attestations)
(a loanword from Spanish)

to appeal something in the courts
(a loanword from Spanish)

proxy (person in charge of carrying out a legal transaction or making a document on behalf of another person)
(a loanword from Spanish)

one legally empowered, a legal representative
(a loanword from Spanish)

a chamber, a room in a house
(a loanword from Spanish)

an apostle
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, late sixteenth century; originally from Sahagún in 1574, a document that Chimalpahin copied)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 136–137.

Orthographic Variants: 
aranzel

a duty, a tariff, a tax, a fee (civil or religious); or, an order in writing from a colonial official
(a loanword from Spanish)

(Cuauhtinchan, Puebla, sixteenth century)
Luis Reyes García, "Ordenanzas para el gobierno de Cuauhtinchan, año de 1559," Estudios de Cultura Náhuatl 10 (1972), 306–307.

Orthographic Variants: 
arbul

tree; also used in conjunction with fireworks, much as "castillo" is used in Spanish today, as a framework upon which fireworks will spin and burn
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
arga

chest, community chest

Orthographic Variants: 
arcu

arch
(a loanword from Spanish)