Spanish Loanwords

Displaying 61 - 90 of 1308
Orthographic Variants: 
arga

chest, community chest

Orthographic Variants: 
arcu

arch
(a loanword from Spanish)

Aries, a zodiac sign
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 128–129.

weapon(s); often in the plural, as a coat of arms, shield, heraldry
(a loanword from Spanish)

a Spanish surname

Orthographic Variants: 
harriero

muleteer
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
arova

a variable measure of weight for liquids; in kilograms today in Spain, between 11.5 and 12.5 kg.
(a loanword from Spanish)

archbishopric, the region overseen by the archbishop
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, 1613)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 264–265.

Orthographic Variants: 
arsoobispo, alsobisbon, arçobispoyotl

archbishop
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
axno

a donkey
(a loanword from Spanish)

a chant the priest says when blessing the altar and congregation with holy water
(a loanword from Spanish, and originally from Latin)

astrologer (see attestations)
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
Azsopcio, Assupcion, Aspsio, asupcion

the Assumption of the Virgin Mary; also, a woman's name and part of a place name, in some cases
(a loanword from Spanish)

casket, coffin; also, a measure for corn
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
audensi, ahudensia, ahuatiensia, aodeçia

high court; or, an audience before officials
(a loanword from Spanish)

in municipal documentation, usually refers to the members of the town council in session (a loanword from Spanish)

Austria, the place name and the family; e.g. doña Margarita de Austria, the late spouse of the king of Spain, don Felipe III

(central Mexico, 1614)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 272–273.

official act, decree (a loanword from Spanish)
James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 211.

Orthographic Variants: 
aue

hail (as in hail Mary)

the offspring of an ass, a little burro (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, asno, burro)

before the Spaniards came (i.e. in pre-Hispanic times; before the invasion and colonization of Mexico); partly a loanword (see attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
asada, asadon

hoe
(a loanword from Spanish)

Leslie S. Offutt, "Levels of Acculturation in Northeastern New Spain; San Esteban Testaments of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries," Estudios de cultura náhuatl 22 (1992), 409–443, see page 434–435.

a lash from a whip
(a loanword from Spanish)

sugar
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
açol, asul

blue

low, of low quality
(a loanword from Spanish)

bullet
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
bargo, barco

a balcony
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
pantera, padera, vandera, vamderra

a flag, a banner
(a loanword from Spanish)

barber-surgeon
(a loanword from Spanish)

ravine
(a loanword from Spanish)