V

Letter V: Displaying 1 - 20 of 52
Orthographic Variants: 
v

the Roman numeral for 5, a loan

Luis Reyes García, Eustaquio Celestino Solís, Armando Valencia Ríos, et al, Documentos nauas de la Ciudad de México del siglo XVI (Mexico City: Centro de Investigación y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social y Archivo General de la Nación, 1996), 103.

Orthographic Variants: 
huacax, baca, bacas, bacastin, baqastin, vacastin

cow, cows (vacas, vacastin, huacax); ox, oxen
(a loanword from Spanish; a reanalyzed plural form of vaca, the word for "cow" in Spanish, huacax, can be seen to intend singular or plural)

Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 69.

a vagabond (a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
Valderrama de Moteuczoma, Valderrama de Moctecoma

a granddaughter of Moteuczoma Xocoyotl had this last name; Chimalpahin specifically calls her a mestiza; indicative of the transition of power that came with the Spanish colonization of Mexico, and how indigenous elites took on Spanish surnames (central Mexico, seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 108–109.

Orthographic Variants: 
Balençia, BalenÇia

a place name and a Spanish last name, but it could also be used by indigenous people; e.g. don Pablo de Valencia, municipal governor of Tlaxcala in 1561 and 1562

Here in This Year: Seventeenth-Century Nahuatl Annals of the Tlaxcala-Puebla Valley, ed. and transl. Camilla Townsend, with an essay by James Lockhart (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010), 166–167.

a name taken by Nahuas in the post-contact period, such as don Antonio Valeriano, a governor and judge in Azcapotzalco; don Antnio married a niece, doña Bárbara (daughter of don Juan de Tovar), and they had a son Nicolás Valeriano (central Mexico, seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 102–103.

Barry D. Sell calls don Antonio Valeriano "the most renowned Nahua Latinist of colonial Mexico"
See Sell's comments in Bartolomé de Alva, A Guide to Confession Large and Small in the Mexican Language, 1634, eds. Barry D. Sell and John Frederick Schwaller, with Lu Ann Homza (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1999), 27, note 58.

valley (part of the title of Hernando Cortés, Marqués del Valle); often a reference to the Valley of Oaxaca, part of his domain
(a loanword from Spanish)

an artistically trimmed mane
(a loanword from Spanish)

cowboy
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
bara, baras, vala, valas, valaz, huara, varatzin

a Spanish colonial "yard," or 0.82 meters; also, the staff or scepter of office of a municipal council member; both of these are concepts introduced by Spaniards  Charles Gibson, The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule: A History of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico, 1519-1810, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1964.

Orthographic Variants: 
basallo, basallos

a vassal

a Spanish surname

resident, citizen

a Spanish family name, taken by some Nahuas; e.g. Alonso Vegerano was one of the literate trilingual Nahuas who participated in the composition of the Florentine Codex

See Sell's comments in Bartolomé de Alva, A Guide to Confession Large and Small in the Mexican Language, 1634, eds. Barry D. Sell and John Frederick Schwaller, with Lu Ann Homza (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1999), 28.

Orthographic Variants: 
beinte, beti

twenty (a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
Belasco

a Spanish surname; the name of two viceroys of New Spain

a name, a Spanish surname; it was also taken by indigenous people; e.g. don Hernando Velázquez, named in the testament of don Antonio Pimentel, possibly an executor or possibly a ruler to succeed Pimentel; he was a son of Coanacochtzin

(central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 202–203.

veil, curtain
(a loanword from Spanish)

venial, little sins

Louise M. Burkhart, Before Guadalupe: The Virgin Mary in Early Colonial Nahuatl Literature, Institute for Mesoamerican Studies Monograph 13 (Albany: University at Albany, 2001), 16.

true or real sale; a legal sale; often indicated somewhere on bills of sale (a loanword from Spanish)