A

Letter A: Displaying 21 - 40 of 2494

to La Villa [de Jalostotitlán], at La Villa, in La Villa

Orthographic Variants: 
ala

Many loan phrases (often run together as one word) do not literally intend the preposition (a) or the article (la).

to [San Juan de] Los Lagos, in [San Juan de] Los Lagos

so, we’ll see

Orthographic Variants: 
à-

(a negator)

up

Horacio Carochi, S.J., Grammar of the Mexican language with an explanation of its adverbs (1645), translated and edited with commentary by James Lockhart, UCLA Latin American Studies Volume 89 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2001), 344 n3.

ɑː

to be present
to, at, on
(a loanword from Spanish)
oh, no, huh? (an interjection)

a vowel, a letter; the long “a”
letter short “a”.
verbalizing suffix
verbalizing suffix.
causative suffix.

dragonfly (partially a loanword from Spanish, from avión, airplane)

http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/nahuat-l/2014-June/005703.html

to step in water and get one’s feet wet after all.
to take water inside a building after all.
to put an animal or a thing in water and get it wet after all.

grooved, furrowed

(central Mexico, sixteenth century)
R. Joe Campbell, Florentine Codex Vocabulary, 1997 .

reed (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
R. Joe Campbell, Florentine Codex Vocabulary, 1997 .

a field of cane or reeds (see Molina)