Spanish Loanwords

Displaying 1291 - 1308 of 1308
Orthographic Variants: 
xv

the Roman numerals for 15, a loan

Orthographic Variants: 
xx

the Roman numerals for 20, a loan

Luis Reyes García, Eustaquio Celestino Solís, Armando Valencia Ríos, et al, Documentos nauas de la Ciudad de México del siglo XVI (Mexico City: Centro de Investigación y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social y Archivo General de la Nación, 1996), 99.

Orthographic Variants: 
xxxv

the Roman numerals for 35 (XXX = 3 x 10, and V = 5)
Luis Reyes García, Eustaquio Celestino Solís, Armando Valencia Ríos, et al, Documentos nauas de la Ciudad de México del siglo XVI (Mexico City: Centro de Investigación y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social y Archivo General de la Nación, 1996), 99.

and
(a loanword from Spanish)

Evangelista
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
yecamecayo cauallo

a horse muzzle or chin strap (see Molina)
(partly a Spanish loanword, caballo, horse)

Orthographic Variants: 
yehua

mare
(a loanword from Spanish)

the trinity of God (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, dios, God)

life force plus the Spanish loanword ánima (soul, spirit), equating to the Christian sense of soul

Stafford Poole, C.M., "Christian Terms in Nahuatl," n.p., n.d.

Orthographic Variants: 
yonta, yota, yotan, yontas

a yoke (of oxen); or, a measure of land, perhaps the amount a yoke of oxen could plow
(a loanword from Spanish)

a Spanish name; e.g. don Fray Juan de Zapata y Sandoval, who was a bishop sent from Mexico City to Chiapas in 1615

(central Mexico, 1615)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 294–295.

shoemaker, shoe salesperson
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
çapatos chiualoyan

a shoe store, a place where shoes are made; a place where shoes are sold (partly a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
çapatos chiuhqui

a shoemaker
(partly a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
çapatox, zapatos

shoe(s) (a loanword from Spanish) James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 213.

pants, wide and long, with many folds; originally a term associated with clothing from Valencia
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
Çarate

a Spanish last name; e.g. Fray Gerónimo de Zarate, a Franciscan chaplain in Tenochtitlan who left to go to Teohuacan (Tehuacan, Puebla?), much to the people's relief

(central Mexico, 1613)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 250–251.

Orthographic Variants: 
Zurita

a Spanish surname; the name carried by a "doctor" (and "oydor" or judge of the high court, the "Real Audiencia") in sixteenth-century New Spain, don Alonzo de Zorita, 1548–1556