Spanish Loanwords

Displaying 1381 - 1410 of 1449
Orthographic Variants: 
bara, baras, vala, valas, valaz, huara, varatzin

a Spanish colonial "yard," or 0.82 meters; also, the staff or scepter of office of a municipal council member; both of these are concepts introduced by Spaniards
Charles Gibson, The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule: A History of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico, 1519-1810, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1964.

Orthographic Variants: 
bazo

the musical term, "base"
See: Sebastián de Covarrubias Orozco, Tesoro de la lengua castellana, Madrid, 1611, where the term vaso appears.

a Spanish surname

Orthographic Variants: 
beinte, beti

twenty (a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
Belasco

a Spanish surname; the name of two viceroys of New Spain

a name, a Spanish surname; it was also taken by indigenous people; e.g. don Hernando Velázquez, named in the testament of don Antonio Pimentel, possibly an executor or possibly a ruler to succeed Pimentel; he was a son of Coanacochtzin

(central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 202–203.

veil, curtain
(a loanword from Spanish)

venial, little sins

Louise M. Burkhart, Before Guadalupe: The Virgin Mary in Early Colonial Nahuatl Literature, Institute for Mesoamerican Studies Monograph 13 (Albany: University at Albany, 2001), 16.

true or real sale; a legal sale; often indicated somewhere on bills of sale (a loanword from Spanish)

sale; part of the expression "bill of sale"
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
bentana, betana, huetana

window

a Spanish surname; e.g. Santiago de Vera, an "alcalde de corte" (probably a Spaniard or a creole), set out for "China" (i.e. the Philippines) in 1584 with four musicians who play wind instruments, but in the end only one chirimía player from Atlixxocan went with him

(central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 28–29.

Orthographic Variants: 
Velachros, Belacros, Belachros, belacruz

a city, and later a state, on the Gulf of Mexico
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
berde

green
(a loanword from Spanish)

a Spanish given name for a female
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
vi

the Roman numeral for 6, a loan (see attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
bicario

vicar
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
fiernes, biernes, bierenes

Friday
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
bicas, picas

beam (see attestations)

vigil; deacon
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
vii

the Roman numerals for 7, a loan

Orthographic Variants: 
billa, alavilla

a town with a certain status in Spanish town hierarchy
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
Villapoerte

a Spanish surname carried by a mestizo, Gabriel de Villafuerte, who was the son of an indigenous noblewoman named doña Juana (daughter of Huehue Chicome Xochitzin) and a Spanish captain and conqueror who came to Mexico in the company of Hernando Cortés, Juan Rodríguez de Villafuerte; Gabriel's grandfather Huehue Chicome Xochitzin was the son of Cacamatzin tlacochcalcatl, who was the son of Tlilpotonqui cihuacoatl, who was the son (apparently) of Tlacaeleltzin; such a genealogy links pre-contact with Spanish colonial times

(central Mexico, seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 89–90, 98–99.

Orthographic Variants: 
Villalouos, Villalovos

a Spanish surname; the name of a Doctor (probably a high court justice) in sixteenth-century New Spain
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
Villanueba

a Spanish surname; the name of a Doctor (probably a high court justice) in sixteenth-century New Spain
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
binagre

vinegar

Orthographic Variants: 
huino, uino, bino

wine, liquor, alcohol (a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
birgine, uirgine

a virgin, a maiden; also, Virgo, a sign of the zodiac

Orthographic Variants: 
Virge, virco

Virgo, a sign of the zodiac; actually, originally a loanword from Latin, although possibly similar in siixteenth-century Spanish; see Lori Boornazian Diel, The Codex Mexicanus: A Guide to Life in Late-Sixteenth-Century New Spain (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018), 173.

Also attested as a sign of the zociac in: central Mexico, early seventeenth century, Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 124–125.

the wife of the viceroy
(a loanword from Spanish)