H

Letter H: Displaying 41 - 60 of 1085

the Hermits, a religious brotherhood
(a loanword from Spanish)

(early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 202–203.

Pedro Hernández Cacamatzin (curiously not called "don") was the son of a don Jacobo and a doña Maria; he was also the grandson of a don Pablo Chimalcoatzin, and therefore the great-grandson of Huehue Mauhcaxochitzin; Pedro's son don Miguel Tlilpotonqui Carsetero was born outside of wedlock

(central Mexico, seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 104–105.

Herod
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, late sixteenth century; originally from Sahagún in 1574, a document that Chimalpahin copied)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 146–147.

the sound of laughter, of someone who is laughing (see Molina)

Orthographic Variants: 
hicox uacqui, hicoxhuacqui, hicoxuacqui

dried figs (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, higos, figs)

Orthographic Variants: 
hicox uatzalli, hicoxhuatzalli, hicoxuatzalli

dried figs (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, higos, figs)

Orthographic Variants: 
hicoxtetzolli

dried figs (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, higos, figs)

Orthographic Variants: 
hicoxtexoxoctli

a green fig, about to ripen (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, higos, figs)

Orthographic Variants: 
hicoxxoxoctetl

a green fig, about to ripen (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, higos, figs)

the fig, a known fruit (see Molina)
(a Nahuatlized loanword from Spanish, higos, figs)

Orthographic Variants: 
hicoxquauitl, hicox quahuitl, hicoxquahuitl, hicox cuahuitl

fig tree (see Molina) (derived from a loanword from Spanish, higos, figs)

Orthographic Variants: 
hicox quauhtla, hicoxquauhtla, hicox cuauhtla

an orchard or plantation of fig trees (see Molina) (derived from a loanword from Spanish, higos, figs)

Orthographic Variants: 
higox, higo, ico, icox, hicox, icos, higos

a fig, fig tree
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 217.

a natural-born son (female version would be hija bastarda (see attestations)
(a loan phrase from Spanish)

(central Mexico, seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 114–115.

a natural-born son (female version would be hija natural) (see attestations)
(a loan phrase from Spanish)

(central Mexico, seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 114–115.

an item used in churches for sprinkling holy water
(a loanword from Spanish)

the sound of the laughter of someone who is laughing (see Molina)

Orthographic Variants: 
guayacan, huayacan

a plant (also called a "blue tree"), possibly a species of box wood, that could be made into a cure for the "French malady" or the "French disease" (syphilis)

(Valley of Mexico, 1570–1587)

The Mexican Treasury: The Writings of Dr. Francisco Hernández, ed. Simon Varey, transl. Rafael Chabrán, Cynthia L. Chamberlin, and Simon Varey (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2000), 121–22.

Orthographic Variants: 
ojas

leaf; piece of paper

a Dutch person
(a loanword from Spanish)