Spanish Loanwords | D

Letter D: Displaying 21 - 40 of 40

the devil
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
diagono

a deacon in the church
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
tisiepre, dezienbre, deçiepre, desepre, disempre, disieprem

December
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
diesmero, diesmeroti

the person who collected the diezmo, the tenth (tithe)

Orthographic Variants: 
tiezmo, diesmo, diesmos

tenth (the tithe)
(a loanword from Spanish)

Franciscan council-board (5 to 6 people)
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
difundo, difoto

deceased (adjective), deceased person (noun)
(loanwords from Spanish)

investigation, action taken by a judicial official in a criminal or civil case
(a loanword from Spanish)

God
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
tifotado, deputado, dibotato

representative; a person named to represent a body, often a cofradia (lay brotherhood)

deputy, one to whom a special task is delegated; in Tlaxcala, a member of the municipal government, often an alcalde, delegated to supervise the marketplace.
(a loanword from Spanish)

The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

Orthographic Variants: 
diçipulos, dicipulos

a disciple
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
toçena

dozen (a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
dotor, doctur, todor

Doctor; a title for a high Spanish official; ecclesiastics often held this degree, including secular priests; they were known to wear tassels on their hats and hoods around their necks in special processions
(a loanword from Spanish)

(early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 206–207.

also, the learned ones in the Gospel who knew the word of God

(central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 150–151.

Orthographic Variants: 
dotrina, toctrina, toctrinan

instruction and tutorin in the Christian doctrine; also, this was used to denote an indigenous parish (see Lockhart and attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
donmigon, domigo

Sunday; also a saint's name, Domingo
(a loanword from Spanish)

don, a title of nobility
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
donia

doña, an honorific title for a woman; similar to lady; used by (or to refer to) both Spaniards and indigenous women

Orthographic Variants: 
tos

two

during
(a loanword from Spanish)

peach
(a loanword from Spanish)