Spanish Loanwords | M

Letter M: Displaying 101 - 109 of 109

a Spanish surname; e.g. don Pedro Moya de Contreras, archibishop of Mexico (e.g. 1584)

(central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 28–29.

Orthographic Variants: 
moyamancai uino

a page who brings wine(?) (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, huino = vino = wine)

servant
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
mola, mulla, molla

(female) mule
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
mulatati

a woman of mixed European and African heritage
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
molato, mollatu

a mulatto, a person of mixed European and African heritage
(a loanword from Spanish)

world
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
Monos Camarco, Monos Gamarco

a Spanish name, but also carried by others; e.g. don Diego Muñoz Camargo (1529–1599), the author of a History of Tlaxcala; his father was a Spaniard who served with Hernando Cortés (the expedition leader against the Aztecs) and his mother was Nahua (of Tlaxcala); he served as municipal governor of Tlaxcala during some years; his son, of the same name, was municipal governor of Tlaxcala (1608–1613); the son married doña Francisca Maxixcatzin, heiress to the rulership of Ocotelolco

Here in This Year: Seventeenth-Century Nahuatl Annals of the Tlaxcala-Puebla Valley, ed. and transl. Camilla Townsend, with an essay by James Lockhart (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010), 173–174.

very
(a loanword from Spanish)