Spanish Loanwords | M

Letter M: Displaying 81 - 100 of 109

a mitre, worn on the head of a bishop
(a loanword from Spanish)

(early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 206–207.

Orthographic Variants: 
mo huerta tlaneuiani

one who rents an orchard from someone else (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
Moysen, Muysen

Moses, the name of a biblical figure, taken by indigenous men (see attestations)

a boundary marker

the location of a boundary marker, the place of the mojón

Orthographic Variants: 
mo juramento tumani

a release from an oath (?) (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, juramento, oath)

a Spanish family name; e.g. the name of a sixteenth-century Franciscan friar, Fray Alonso de Molina, a famous lexicographer

See Sell's comments in Bartolomé de Alva, A Guide to Confession Large and Small in the Mexican Language, 1634, eds. Barry D. Sell and John Frederick Schwaller, with Lu Ann Homza (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1999), 20.

a mill
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
monesterio, monestelio

monastery
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
monjastin, moxas, mojas

nun
(a loanword from Spanish)

a mount (a tool) (see attestations)

a religious structure related to Easter; a wooden monument upon which to hold Mass (a loanword from Spanish)

purple (see attestations)

a Spanish surname; e.g. doctor Antonio de Morga, alcalde of the Audiencia (high court) in Mexico City, who went to Peru to be the President of the Royal Audiencia

(central Mexico, 1614)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 280–281.

beam (see attestations)

a Moorish woman; or, in Mexico, a woman of mixed heritage, partly African
(a loanword from Spanish)

a Moor; or, in Mexico, a person of mixed heritage, part African
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
mortaxa

a shroud (for burial)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 40.

Orthographic Variants: 
mostranza

a plant found in Nahuatl-language texts; smells like mint

Miriam Melton-Villanueva, The Aztecs at Independence: Nahua Culture Makers in Central Mexico, 1799–1832 (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2016), 146, and note 1, page 222.

Orthographic Variants: 
motquitica uino

pure wine, not mixed with anything else (see Molina; partly a loan word, huino = vino = wine)