Spanish Loanwords

Displaying 481 - 510 of 1449

contour; shape
(a loanword from Spanish)

to contradict, or protest the possession of land asserted by another person
(a loanword from Spanish)

to contradict
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 215.

contracts, legal business
(a loanword from Spanish)

a Spanish surname

Convalescent, a name for a religious order
(a loanword from Spanish)

(early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 202–203.

Orthographic Variants: 
conuento

monastery
(a loanword from Spanish)

(early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 198–199.

a Spanish surname; e.g. don Diego Fernández de Córdoba, a viceroy; his title was Marqués de Guadalcázar

(central Mexico, 1613)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 258–259, 264–265.

cord, rope
(a loanword from Spanish)

a choir (part of a church building; or, a singing group )
(a loanword from Spanish)

a crown
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
coronaua

crowned; or, a person with a crown (see Molina) (the root is corona, Spanish for crown)

to crown
(a Nahuatlization of a Spanish verb, coronar)

to crown someone (see Molina)
(at root, a loanword from Spanish, corona, crown)

Orthographic Variants: 
corpos xpi

Corpus Christi
(loanwords from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
colal

corral, an enclosure for animals
(a loanword from Spanish)

corridor
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
gonregidor, gorregidor, colexitol

title for a colonial official, the highest magistrate of a district, often equivalent to "alcalde mayor"
The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

the place, office, and/or district of a corregidor (colonial Spanish official) (at root, a loanword from Spanish)

the court
(a loanword from Spanish)

an elite indigenous family name, partly taken from the Spanish expedition leader Hernando Cortés; e.g. don Antonio Cortés Totoquihuaztli the younger, who ruled in Tlacopan (Tacuba); he was a member of the ruling dynasty there; he died in 1614, possibly of matlaltotonqui; he left behind two small daughters
(central Mexico, 1614)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 284–285.

He married doña Juana de Alvarado.
Fernando Alvarado Tezozomoc, Crónica mexicana (Mexico City: UNAM, 1994), xviii.

Don Antonio Cortés Totoquihuaztli of Tlacopan apparently wrote to Charles V in 1552 to request (and received) a coat of arms for his family and one for his town.
María Castañeda de la Paz and Miguel Luque-Talaván, "Privileges of the 'Others': The Coats of Arms Granted to Indigenous Conquistadors," in Simon McKeown, ed., The International Emblem (2010), 294–296.

cost, value, price
(a loanword from Spanish)

sack
(a loanword from Spanish)

an American-born Spaniard
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
quixtiano, chritiano, cristiyano, xpiano, xpianosme, nichristiano, Christiano, christianosme, christianoyotl, christianoyotica, quixtianotin, quixtianoto

literally, a Christian, but this could also simply mean a Spaniard or a European
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
xpianoyotl, cristianotl

things of Christianity
(based on a loanword from Spanish)

Christ
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
chronica

a chronicle, a history, a narrative, an account (see attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
croçifijos, crusifixo, crusificos, crucifixo, cruzcifixus, cruzifixus, crucifixu,

crucifix
(a loanword from Spanish); also often seen as a loan from Latin)

a reference to an inexpensive burial
(a loanword from Spanish)