Spanish Loanwords

Displaying 451 - 480 of 1449

a companion
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, 1612)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 228–229.

a company; a military company
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
gonpas

a measure in music
(a loanword from Spanish, also called a punto)

to comprise, to be composed of
(a loanword from Spanish)

Leslie S. Offutt, "Levels of Acculturation in Northeastern New Spain; San Esteban Testaments of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries," Estudios de cultura náhuatl 22 (1992), 409–443, see page 440–441.

to celebrate Holy Communion
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
gomunidad, comonidad, comonidat, comonidar

community; community chest; even seen to mean "in common"
(a loanword from Spanish)

Communion, holy communion; sometimes used to refer to a cofradía
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
consepçio, Coceptio

conception; also a reference to the immaculate conception in the Christian religious belief (see attestations)

conscience
(a loanword from Spanish)

Susanne Klaus, Uprooted Christianity: The Preaching of the Christian Doctrine in Mexico, Based on Franciscan Sermons of the 16th Century Written in Nahuatl (Bonn: Bonner Amerikanistische Studien e. V. c/o Seminar für Völkerkunde, Universität Bonn, 1999), 249.

Orthographic Variants: 
gonzierdo

a good order and disposition of things; an agreement
(a loanword from Spanish)

a council
(a loanword from Spanish)

a count, a title of nobility
(a loanword from Spanish)

confession (in the church; a loanword from Spanish) (see attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
confessoresme

confessor (see attestation; e.g.central Mexico, late sixteenth century; originally from Sahagún in 1574, a document that Chimalpahin copied)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 162–163.

Orthographic Variants: 
gunfilmacio

confirmation
(a loanword from Spanish)

to confirm
(a loanword from Spanish)

to confirm (in office)
(a loanword from Spanish)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 215.

confection, candy
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
confites chiua

to make candies
(partly a loanword from Spanish, confites, candies)

a candy maker (see Molina)
(partly a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
gongrecacion, gongricaçio

a program of concentrated settlements, systematic resettlements of indigenous people organized by Spaniards to concentrate people more
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
congrecador

a congregator, a person who would concentrate settlements after population losses due to epidemics
(a loanword from Spanish)

the conquest (Spanish invasion and colonization of Mexico)

Orthographic Variants: 
conguitadores

conqueror
(a loanword from Spanish)

to conquer
(a loanword from Spanish)

consecration; e.g. of the host and the wine, by the priests (central Mexico, late sixteenth century; originally from Sahagún in 1574, a document that Chimalpahin copied)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 178–179.

council, court
(a loanword from Spanish)

the father of one's child-in-law, one's fellow father-in-law
(a loanword from Spanish)

Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 248.

accountant
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
contadoria

the royal accounting office
(a loanword from Spanish)