Spanish Loanwords

Displaying 331 - 360 of 1345
Orthographic Variants: 
cohuete

fireworks
(a loanword from Spanish)

This indigenous community appears in a Relación Geográfica in a region that is now part of Mexican state of Morelos.

Matrícula de Tributos (Tribute Roll), Digital World Library, http://www.wdl.org/en/item/3248/pages.html#volume/1/page/5.

Orthographic Variants: 
coxin

a cushion
(a loanword from Spanish)

pad (on a horse's back, for riding)
(a loanword from Spanish)

a side altar piece

mattress
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
colegios, golesio, collegio

the school, a school
(a loanword from Spanish)

yellow fever (partly a loanword from Spanish, colera, cholera) (20th c., Milpa Alta)
Los cuentos en náhuatl de Doña Luz Jiménez, recop. Fernando Horcasitas y Sarah O. de Ford (México: UNAM, 1979), 36–37.

a type of cabbage (?)
(partly a loanword from Spanish, coles, cabbages, plus quiyotl, stem or sprout of a plant)

a small cabbage (partly a loanword from Spanish, coles, cabbages)

female ritual coparent
(a loanword from Spanish)

Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 248.

comet
(a loanword from Spanish)

a badge
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, 1612)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 230–231.

commissary, commissioner, delegate, deputy, manager, superintendent, captain, commissioner
(a loanword from Spanish)

commission
(a loanword from Spanish)

as, like
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
conpadre

male ritual co-parent, co-godfather
(a loanword from Spanish)

Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 248.

co-parenthood, a fictive kinship within the Catholic church (see Molina)
(at root, a loanword from Spanish)

a companion
(a loanword from Spanish)

(central Mexico, 1612)
see Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 228–229.

a company; a military company
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
gonpas

a measure in music
(a loanword from Spanish, also called a punto)

to comprise, to be composed of
(a loanword from Spanish)

Leslie S. Offutt, "Levels of Acculturation in Northeastern New Spain; San Esteban Testaments of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries," Estudios de cultura náhuatl 22 (1992), 409–443, see page 440–441.

to celebrate Holy Communion
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
gomunidad, comonidad, comonidat, comonidar

community; community chest; even seen to mean "in common"
(a loanword from Spanish)

Communion, holy communion; sometimes used to refer to a cofradía
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
consepçio, Coceptio

conception; also a reference to the immaculate conception in the Christian religious belief (see attestations)

conscience
(a loanword from Spanish)

Susanne Klaus, Uprooted Christianity: The Preaching of the Christian Doctrine in Mexico, Based on Franciscan Sermons of the 16th Century Written in Nahuatl (Bonn: Bonner Amerikanistische Studien e. V. c/o Seminar für Völkerkunde, Universität Bonn, 1999), 249.

Orthographic Variants: 
gonzierdo

a good order and disposition of things; an agreement
(a loanword from Spanish)