Spanish Loanwords | A

Letter A: Displaying 21 - 40 of 92
Orthographic Variants: 
alcarte mayor

highest magistrate of a district, often equivalent to "corregidor" and usually held by a Spanish colonial official
The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

full wording for "alcalde," in this context, an indigenous officer, on the town council (cabildo)
The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

Orthographic Variants: 
algalde, alcalte

a first-instance judge attached to a local municipal government; this was a term used for both indigenous and Spanish officials
Caterina Pizzigoni, Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2007), 248.

the office of the alcalde, a member of the municipal council (partly a loanword from Spanish, with the -yotl ending from Nahuatl) (ca. 1582, Mexico City)
Luis Reyes García, ¿Como te confundes? ¿Acaso no somos conquistados? Anales de Juan Bautista (Mexico: Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, Biblioteca Lorenzo Boturini Insigne y Nacional Basílica de Guadalupe, 2001), 136–137.

Orthographic Variants: 
Alimania

Germany

a type of sable, short and curved, with a sharp edge only on one side, except at the point (see attestations)

crumbly shortbread.
Orthographic Variants: 
alhuacil mayor, alhuasil mayor, alhuasil mayol

a chief constable; an officer who was a part of the town council (cabildo)

Orthographic Variants: 
alguazil, alguaçil, alhuacil, alhuaçil, arguazil, alhuasil

a constable, a sub-cabildo officer
The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

Orthographic Variants: 
arimentos

food (see attestations)

horse-riding apparatus (see attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
almoada, almohuada

pillow (see attestations)

auction
(a loanword from Spanish)

Orthographic Variants: 
almo, almoh

a Spanish dry measure, one-twelfth of a fanega, typically used to explain how much land can be planted in this quantify of seed; almoh is the contemporary variation from Eastern Huastecan Nahuatl (IDIEZ)
The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 15; and see Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 26.

1. measurement of four large or eight small cuartillos of land. 2. measurement of four cuartillos of corn, tomato, sesame, etc.
Orthographic Variants: 
artar, altal

altar, whether in a church, or in a home (see attestations)

a personal name that combines a Spanish surname that was taken by indigenous nobles and a Nahua name (see attestations)

a Spanish surname; introduced by earlier invaders, such as Pedro de Alvarado Contreras and Jorge de Alvarado y Contreras; also a name taken by figures in the indigenous elite, e.g. don Jorge Alvarado of Tetzcoco (central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 186–187.

Orthographic Variants: 
alhuexo

a plant native to Spain; also called almorta (see attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
ame

Amen
(a loanword from Spanish)

an amice, an undervestment worn around the neck and shoulders by a bishop (early seventeenth century, central New Spain)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 206–207.