ánima.

(a loanword from Spanish)

Headword: 
ánima.
Principal English Translation: 

soul (this word is usually seen possessed in Nahuatl) (see Molina and attestations)

Orthographic Variants: 
-anima, animan
Alonso de Molina: 

yauh ytlaqual yn tanima. el mantenimiento de nuestra anima.
Alonso de Molina, Vocabulario en lengua castellana y mexicana y mexicana y castellana, 1571, part 2, Nahuatl to Spanish, f. 31v. col. 1. Thanks to Joe Campbell for providing the transcription.

Attestations from sources in English: 

yn cofradia yntech pohui yn animasme purgatorio tetlechipahualloyan moyetzticate. = The cofradía dedicated to the Souls of Purgatory, where people are purified by fire (central Mexico, 1612)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 214–215.

ayac quiçaz, yn iquac ye quiçaznequi yn ianima = No one will leave when the soul of the sick is just about to come out
Fray Alonso de Molina, Nahua Confraternities in Early Colonial Mexico: The 1552 Nahuatl Ordinances of fray Alonso de Molina, OFM, ed. and trans., Barry D. Sell (Berkeley: Academy of American Franciscan History, 2002), 116–117.

quimoselilis noanimantzin noyoliantzin = accept my soul and spirit (Santa María de la Asunción, Toluca Valley, 1760)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 175.

se misa yhua rrespos Ca huel ypalehuiloCa noannimantzin nolloliantzin yes = a mass with a responsory prayer will be the great help of my soul and spirit. (Santa María de la Asunción, Toluca Valley, 1759)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 174.

noanimantzin, nanimantzin = two additional variants for "my soul," a common term in testaments. Central Nahuatl elided the vowels more than was seen in peripheral Nahuatl, so the second example was more typical in the Central highlands.
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 36.

nanima, naniman = my soul = no (my) + anima (soul, Spanish loanword); nanimatzin (with the reverential ending)
Robert Haskett and Stephanie Wood's notes from Nahuatl sessions with James Lockhart and subsequent research.

yn noyoliya yn nanima = my spirit and soul; itech nictlaliya yn nanima dios = I commend my soul to God (Tlaxcala, 1566)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 1 44–45.

Ma yehuatzin Spu Sancto ytlan moyetztie yn cenca mahuiztic amatlaçoanimantzin = May the holy spirit dwell in your very honored dear souls (Mexico City, 1587)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 32, 198–199.

yn iquac yntla oninomiquili y[n] naniman nicnocemmaquilia yn notecuiyo yn dios = For the time when I have died, I give my soul entirely to my lord God (Coyoacan, 1588)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 2, 54–55.

yn nopan motlatoltizque niquinnonahuatilia alfaceas yn ipa[n] motlatoltizque naniman = as to those who will speak for me, I appoint as my executors who can speak for my soul... (Coyoacan, 1588)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 2, 56–57.

nocontlalia yn noyollia yn nanima = I commend my spirit and soul to his hands (San Bartolomé Atenco, Coyoacan, 1617)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 3, 58–59.

centetl missa mayor yc palehuiloz naniman = one high mass for for the aid of my soul (San Bartolomé Atenco, Coyoacan, 1617)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 3, 58–59.

yn noyolia yn naniman = my spirit and soul; chiquacentetl huehuey misas cantadas ypampa yaniman Doña ysabel = six high masses to be sung for the soul of doña Isabel (Coyoacan, 1622)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 4, 64–65.

y nanimantzin motlachieltitica (S. Simón Pochtlan, Azcapotzalco, 1695)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 5.

pero noanimantzin Ca san huel pactica ... noyoliantzin noanimantzin (Metepec, 1795)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 6.

y naniman (Chiucnauhpan, Coyoacan, 1608)
Frances Karttunen and James Lockhart, Nahuatl in the Middle Years: Language Contact Phenomena in Texts of the Colonial Period, Linguistics 85 (Los Angeles, University of California Publications, 1976), Doc. 3.

cenca quitepexihuiya yn ianiman (Coyoacan, 1613)
Frances Karttunen and James Lockhart, Nahuatl in the Middle Years: Language Contact Phenomena in Texts of the Colonial Period, Linguistics 85 (Los Angeles, University of California Publications, 1976), Doc. 6.

sen misa de requia nopan mitos ypanlenhuiloCa y nanima (Centlalpan, Chalco, 1736)
Frances Karttunen and James Lockhart, Nahuatl in the Middle Years: Language Contact Phenomena in Texts of the Colonial Period, Linguistics 85 (Los Angeles, University of California Publications, 1976), Doc. 10.

y noanima (Centlalpan, Chalco, 1736)
Frances Karttunen and James Lockhart, Nahuatl in the Middle Years: Language Contact Phenomena in Texts of the Colonial Period, Linguistics 85 (Los Angeles, University of California Publications, 1976), Doc. 10.

Anima and yollotl are used interchangeably in Juan Bautista's sermon of ca. 1599, both meaning soul. They are sometimes paired, which is an indication of their parallel meaning: teyolia teanima (the norm is for yollotl to precede the loanword).
Susanne Klaus, Uprooted Christianity: The Preaching of the Christian Doctrine in Mexico, Based on Franciscan Sermons of the 16th Century Written in Nahuatl (Bonn: Bonner Amerikanistische Studien e. V. c/o Seminar für Völkerkunde, Universität Bonn, 1999), 145.

ma ihtic ximocallotitzino in tanima, ca cenca ic moyollalia cenca ic mochicahua in tanima = Lodge Yourself within our souls, for thus our souls are consoled, thus they are strengthened (central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 168–169.

IDIEZ morfema: 
ānimah.
IDIEZ traduc. inglés: 
the soul of a dead person.
IDIEZ def. náhuatl: 
Miccatzin itonal. “Ilhuititlan axacah tequitih pampa itztoqueh miac animahtziztin huan axcualli quichihuazceh ce tlamantli tequitl; yeca nochi macehualmeh zan itztoqueh ininchan.”
IDIEZ morfología: 
ánima (huahca.)
IDIEZ gramática: 
tlat.