tlilli.

Headword: 
tlilli.
Principal English Translation: 

soot, black ink; also, a person's name (attested male)

James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 239.

IPAspelling: 
tɬiːlli
Alonso de Molina: 

tlilli. tinta.
Alonso de Molina, Vocabulario en lengua castellana y mexicana y mexicana y castellana, 1571, part 2, Nahuatl to Spanish, f. 147v. col. 2. Thanks to Joe Campbell for providing the transcription.

Frances Karttunen: 

TLĪL-LI black ink, soot / tinta (M).
Frances Karttunen, An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1992), 308.

Attestations from sources in English: 

tlīlpotōnqueh = the black-stinkers [i.e., the pecaries] (Atenango, between Mexico City and Acapulco, 1629)
Hernando Ruiz de Alarcón, Treatise on the Heathen Superstitions That Today Live Among the Indians Native to This New Spain, 1629, eds. and transl. J. Richard Andrews and Ross Hassig (Norman and London: University of Oklahoma Press, 1984), 107.

tliltique teucacatzacti mitoque = the blacks were called soiled gods (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
James Lockhart, We People Here: Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico, Repertorium Columbianum v. 1 (Los Angeles: UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 1993), 82.

Tlilli tlapalli, “the black, the red," connoted the pictorial books in which the traditions were recorded. Also seen as in tlilli, in tlapalli, and in itlil, in itlapal. (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
Fray Bernardino de Sahagún, Primeros Memoriales, ed. Thelma D. Sullivan, et al. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), 228.

auh ayc polihuiz ayc ylcahuiz yn oquichihuaco yn intlillo yn intlapallo yn intenyo yn imitolloca yn imilnamicoca = And what they came to do, what they came to establish, their writings, their renown, their history, their memory will never perish, will never be forgotten in times to come. (central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 1, 60–61.

TEOTLAHTOLPAN tlillotoc tlapallotoc = in the sacred words it lies in the black ink (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
Louise M. Burkhart, Before Guadalupe: The Virgin Mary in Early Colonial Nahuatl Literature, Institute for Mesoamerican Studies Monograph 13 (Albany: University at Albany, 2001), 110.

Tlalloc, inechichiuh, mixtlilmacaticac = The Array of Tlaloc, his face is painted black. (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
Fray Bernardino de Sahagún, Primeros Memoriales, ed. Thelma D. Sullivan, et al. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), 97.

Inamox, intlacuilol. Zan ic no yehoatl quitoznequi: intlil, intlapal. = Their books, their writings. This means the same as, their black and their red. (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
Thelma D. Sullivan, "Nahuatl Proverbs, Conundrums, and Metaphors, Collected by Sahagún," Estudios de Cultura Náhuatl 4 (1963), 176–177.

S. L. Cline notes that The Book of Tributes (Early Sixteenth-Century Nahuatl Censuses from Morelos) were written in a "dark and distinct" black ink, "likely linked to the completely alphabetic form of the text, since there are no pictorial elements which might have necessitated the use of other colors."
The Book of Tributes: Early Sixteenth-Century Nahuatl Censuses from Morelos, ed. and transl. S. L. Cline, (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 1993), 10.

ytoca po tlilli = named Pedro Tlilli (Cuernavaca region, ca. 1540s)
The Book of Tributes: Early Sixteenth-Century Nahuatl Censuses from Morelos, ed. and transl. S. L. Cline, (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 1993), 128–129.

In tlapallacujloque intechpa oalqujҫa: in quenmanjan tlatlacoa, in jquac tlatlilanja: in quenmanjan qujtlilpatlaoa = It derives from painters of colors who sometimes err when they outline something in black; sometimes they spread the black (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain; Book 6 -- Rhetoric and Moral Philosophy, No. 14, Part 7, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. Dibble (Santa Fe and Salt Lake City: School of American Research and the University of Utah, 1961), 233.

Attestations from sources in Spanish: 

In tlapallacujloque intechpa oalqujҫa: in quenmanjan tlatlacoa, in jquac tlatlilanja: in quenmanjan qujtlilpatlaoa = el que humjllãdose de alguna cosa que esta haziendo dize njtlatlilpatlaoa hago poco y mal como el pintor necio que haze mal su officio (centro de Mexico, s. XVII)
Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain; Book 6 -- Rhetoric and Moral Philosophy, No. 14, Part 7, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. Dibble (Santa Fe and Salt Lake City: School of American Research and the University of Utah, 1961), 233.