milli.

Headword: 
milli.
Principal English Translation: 

cultivated field, a land parcel under cultivation (see Molina, Karttunen, and Lockhart); also, a person's name (see Cline, attestations with English translations)

Orthographic Variants: 
mili, milly, mily
IPAspelling: 
miːlli
Alonso de Molina: 

milli. heredad.
Alonso de Molina, Vocabulario en lengua castellana y mexicana y mexicana y castellana, 1571, part 2, Nahuatl to Spanish, f. 56v. col. 1. Thanks to Joe Campbell for providing the transcription.

Frances Karttunen: 

MĪL-LI cultivated land, field / heredad (M), sementera (C)
Frances Karttunen, An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1992), 147.

Lockhart’s Nahuatl as Written: 

cultivated field, milpa. 225
James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 225.

Attestations from sources in English: 

quimotlalili testamento ca yn imiltzin yn içacamoltzin ytztli yhuetzyan yhuā in auaquauhyacac yn tepemapā yvan in teocontitlan ca moch tecpā quimopouilitia tecpā quimocaulitia, auh yn çan iyo ȳ çan ye iyo ytettzinco quimitalhuitia ytettzinco quimopouilitia in xipetzco ymiltzin yçacamoltzin ȳ axcā quimochiuilia niccauhtzitzinhuan = he made and set down his will. He assigned all his cultivated property, his worked fields in Itztli Ihuetzyan and in Ahuaquauhyacac, in Tepemapan, and in Tecontitlan to the palace; he left them to the palace. And only his cultivated property, his worked fields in Xipetzco, did he dedicate and assign to my younger brothers, who are now working them. (central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 214–215.

milli axalpan = cultivated property at Axalpan (Here translated as "cultivated property," to distinguish it from milla "lands.") (central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 208–209.

yhuan in pipiltin inmil [...] cenca ye quihiyohuia in pipiltin in tlaxcalla in huexotzinco in chalco. ye nohuia ompa teyeElimiquilia in pipiltin auh yn Cihua ye ommotetzahtzahuililia teyquitilia auh ȳ calpixque. ca hahuicpa q'nhuica yhuā in pipiltin intech pohuia = And as to the noblemen's lands [...] the noblemen suffered much in Tlaxcala, in Huexotzinco, in Chalco, everywhere that men work fields for the noblemen. But the women kept on spinning for them, weaving for them. And the stewards took them from one place to another, along with the noblemen pertaining to them. (central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 198–199.

yn isquich yc otlatocat yn oquiman ymil ahu in icoac omic cuix ma oncan pouh yn tecpan cayyo ca onquiça ca ytech phui yn inpilhuan ahu in tlacalaquili yn tilmatli yhuan yn pisquitl. yn tlaolli cequi quitemaca cequi çan yc quicohua chalchihuitl. teocuitlatl x̶i̶h̶u̶i̶t̶l̶.̶ ahu in icoac omique ca ye intech povi. yn inpilhuan cuix ma oncan quicauhtihui in tecpan ca çan iuhqui y ye ypan netlayecoltilo tlatocayotl. = all that he ruled over, all the lands he took for himself, when he has died, belong to the palace alone; what belonged to his children has ended. And as to the tributes, the capes, and the harvest of shelled corn, [such rulers] give some to others; with some they buy precious green stones and gold. But when they have died, [these things] belong to their children. Did they leave them to the palace as if they were acquired for the realm? (central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 190–191.

ca y çatepan in ihquac ye itech timomati in qualli yectli cenca timoyollaliz. yuhquinma milpan tlaxoxohuiaya tinemiz. tiquittaz. in xilotl in elotl. yn huauhtli yn chie. yn tiquaz. yn tiquiz. = For later, when you become a follower of what is good and righteous, you will be much comforted. You will live as if in a fresh, green field. You will find the green corn, the ripened ear of corn, the amaranth, the chia that you will eat, that you will drink. (central Mexico, early seventeenth century)
Codex Chimalpahin: Society and Politics in Mexico Tenochtitlan, Tlatelolco, Culhuacan, and Other Nahuatl Altepetl in Central Mexico; The Nahuatl and Spanish Annals and Accounts Collected and Recorded by don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), vol. 2, 132–133.

chicotetl y vevey yn ixtlavactl y tocalpolal y tomil...vel tocolhua totava ynmil tovevemil = seven [chinampas] on the plain, which is our calpulli land, our milli...really it was the milli of our grandfathers and fathers, our ancient milli (Tulancingo, ca. 1570)
James Lockhart collection, in a folder called "Land and Economy," citing the Tulancingo collection at UCLA, Special Collections, Research Library, Folder 1. English translation proposed by Stephanie Wood.

Zan nechca noxōchimīlpan; zan nechca nocuauhmīlpan = Only right over there to my flower field; only right over there to my tree field.(Atenango, between Mexico City and Acapulco, 1629)
Hernando Ruiz de Alarcón, Treatise on the Heathen Superstitions That Today Live Among the Indians Native to This New Spain, 1629, eds. and transl. J. Richard Andrews and Ross Hassig (Norman and London: University of Oklahoma Press, 1984), 92.

yn itemilticauh señor don juan de guzman = señor don Juan de Guzmán's field workers (Coyoacan, mid-sixteenth century)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 26, 164–165.

ynotemilticahuan niquimacac = I gave it to my field workers (Coyoacan, mid-sixteenth century)
Beyond the Codices, eds. Arthur J.O. Anderson, Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1976), Doc. 26, 164–165.

yz ca yn imil chicuematli yz ca yn itequivh ce çotli canavac ya yxquich yn itequivh y napovaltica quicava çecotli [sic? meant çeçotli?] y cuavhnavacayotli yz ca yn itetlacualtil ce çotli canavac ya ixquich yn itequivh = Here is his field: 8 matl. Here is his tribute that he delivers every 80 days: one quarter-length of a Cuernavaca cloak each time. Here is his provisions tribute: one quarter-length of a narrow cloak. That is all of his tribute. (Cuernavaca region, ca. 1540s)
The Book of Tributes: Early Sixteenth-Century Nahuatl Censuses from Morelos, ed. and transl. S. L. Cline, (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 1993), 112–113.

yz ca yn imil ōpulhualli = here is his field; it is forty [units of measurement] (Cuernavaca, 1535–45)
James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 190.

milli = cultivated field; tlalmilli = field
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 25.

ymiltitech = next to his or her field
Robert Haskett and Stephanie Wood's notes from Nahuatl sessions with James Lockhart and subsequent research.

y nica cate ayamo tequiti ya qui ya quimacazque y milly = Those who are here do not pyet ay any tribute. They will soon give them a field. (Cuernavaca region, ca. 1540s)
The Book of Tributes: Early Sixteenth-Century Nahuatl Censuses from Morelos, ed. and transl. S. L. Cline, (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 1993), 162–163.

milli = field
Susan Kellogg, Law and the Transformation of Aztec Culture, 1500–1700 (Norman and London: University of Oklahoma Press, 1995), 225.

yn huinomilli ye moxochiotia = the vineyards are now flowering (late sixteenth century, Central Mexico)
Louise M. Burkhart, Before Guadalupe: The Virgin Mary in Early Colonial Nahuatl Literature, Institute for Mesoamerican Studies Monograph 13 (Albany: University at Albany, 2001), 49.

ytoca domigo mily = named Domingo Milli (Cuernavaca region, ca. 1540s)
The Book of Tributes: Early Sixteenth-Century Nahuatl Censuses from Morelos, ed. and transl. S. L. Cline, (Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 1993), 140–141.

"se mili" [ce milli] = a piece of land, milpa presumably; but by tracking parcel size, use, and value, we may be able to refine our understanding of this term in comparison with tlalli and other terms for parcels. In Calimaya, in 1734, this piece of land measured 102 (North-South) by 142 (East-West) varas, could be planted with 3 almudes of maize (tlaoli) seed, and sold for 20 pesos to a "don" who was the gobernador.
Stephanie Wood collection, notes from Nahuatl documents in the file "Bills of Sale," citing AGN (Mexico) Tierras 2535, exp. 13, ff. 5v., 6r.

"se nomill" = "one piece of land (milli) of mine;" this was sold by one "don" to another "don" for 11 pesos; it measured 25 quahuitl, said to be 20 and "tlaco" matlacquahuitl, and it held 2.5 almudes of maize seed. It would appear from this example that the matlacquahuitl or matlaquahuitl was slightly larger than the quahuitl. (San Miguel Almoloya, Toluca Valley, 1754)
Stephanie Wood collection, notes from Nahuatl documents in the file "Bills of Sale," citing AGN (Mexico) Tierras 2539, exp. 11, ff. 4r, 7r. (Spanish translation on 7r.)

"se mili" [ce milli] = a piece of land, milpa presumably; size not given; sold for 19 pesos by the mayordomo (of the cofradía, presumably) to a nephew, to pay for a fiesta of the cofradía of San Antonio
Stephanie Wood collection, notes from Nahuatl documents in the file "Bills of Sale," citing AGN (Mexico) Tierras 2535, exp. 13, ff. 20r, 21r.

"tlali mili" is a paired phrase found multiple times in the boundary survey that is part of a narrative of migration and settlement of people who went from Xochimilco to Ocotequila, Guerrero. The Nahuatl narrative was translated to Spanish in the second half of the eighteenth century.
Danièle Dehouve, "Dos relatos sobre migraciones nahuas en el Estado de Guerrero," Estudios de Cultura Náhuatl 12 (1976), see especially p. 145.

Attestations from sources in Spanish: 

míl = maizal/milpa; ne míl = la milpa (Sonsonate, El Salvador, 1996)
Tirso Canales, Nahuat (Sonsonate: Universidad de El Salvador, 1996), 11.

notlalcohualtzin huey milli = mi tierra comprada, un gran sembradío (Cuernavaca, 1597)
Vidas y bienes olvidados: Testamentos indígenas novohispanos, vol. 2, Testamentos en náhuatl y castellano del siglo XVI, eds., Teresa Rojas Rabiela, Elsa Leticia Rea López, Constantino Medina Lima (Mexico: Consejo Nacional de Ciencias Tecnología, 1999), 302–303.

Yn nomil atlalli yzquican imamani yc ceccan Atzaqualoyan Tianquiztonco meyotoc etemani Teçoquipan ontemani = mis tierras de riego están una en el lugar que llaman (Atzacualoian), otra en Tianguistonco, poblada de magueyes, la tercera en dos suertes en el paraje que llaman Thezoquipan (Tetepango, Hidalgo, 1586)
Vidas y bienes olvidados: Testamentos indígenas novohispanos, vol. 2, Testamentos en náhuatl y castellano del siglo XVI, eds., Teresa Rojas Rabiela, Elsa Leticia Rea López, Constantino Medina Lima (Mexico: Consejo Nacional de Ciencias Tecnología, 1999), 264–265.

concahuia Tepetitlan mani milli çan no atoctlalli çan in nepanmil = entrambas les doy una milpa y tierra que está y es en la parte que dicen Tepetitlan, para que sea para entrambas (Xochimilco, Tlaxcala, 1569)
Vidas y bienes olvidados: Testamentos indígenas novohispanos, vol. 2, Testamentos en náhuatl y castellano del siglo XVI, eds., Teresa Rojas Rabiela, Elsa Leticia Rea López, Constantino Medina Lima (Mexico: Consejo Nacional de Ciencias Tecnología, 1999), 152–153.

auh ynic oca mani ymilditech Juan de Rosas catca = Y las que se encuentran situadas junto a la sementera que fue de[l difunto] Juan de Rosas (Coyoacan, 1560)
Vidas y bienes olvidados: Testamentos indígenas novohispanos, vol. 2, Testamentos en náhuatl y castellano del siglo XVI, eds., Teresa Rojas Rabiela, Elsa Leticia Rea López, Constantino Medina Lima (Mexico: Consejo Nacional de Ciencias Tecnología, 1999), 122–123.

ychpoch yn axcan moteylhui nicmati yn imil = es su hija la que ahora se demanda, sé que es su milpa (Ciudad de México, 1558)
Luis Reyes García, Eustaquio Celestino Solís, Armando Valencia Ríos, et al, Documentos nauas de la Ciudad de México del siglo XVI (México: Centro de Investigación y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social y Archivo General de la Nación, 1996), 99.

mi:l = milli
Secundino, mu:sta yoyahui gat ti:c mi:l. = Secundino, man:ana tienes que ir al maizal. (Sonsonate, El Salvador, Nahuat or Pipil, s. XX)
Tirso Canales, Nahuat (San Salvador: Universidad de El Salvador, Editorial Universitaria, 1996), 11–12.

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