ichpochtli.

Headword: 
ichpochtli.
Principal English Translation: 

adolescent girl or young woman; maiden, virgin; daughter

Orthographic Variants: 
ichpuchtli, ichpōchtli
IPAspelling: 
itʃpoːtʃtɬi
Alonso de Molina: 

ichpochtli. virgen, o muger por casar.
Alonso de Molina, Vocabulario en lengua castellana y mexicana y mexicana y castellana, 1571, part 2, Nahuatl to Spanish, f. 32v. col. 1. Thanks to Joe Campbell for providing the transcription.

Frances Karttunen: 

(I)CHPŌCH-TLI pl: (I)CHPŌPŌCHTIN maiden, young woman / virgen o mujer por casar (M) (I)CHPŌCH-TLI and also TĒLPŌCH-TLI ‘young man’ both form the plural by reduplicating the PŌCH element, which suggests that *PŌCH-TLI, although it does not appear as a free form, is a stem in its own right, and (I)CH is a modifier. A variant form of (I)CHPŌCH-TLI is (I)CHPOCA-TL, corresponding to the variants TĒLPOCH-TLI and TĒLPOCA-TL ‘young man’.
Frances Karttunen, An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1992), 93.

Horacio Carochi / English: 

ichpōchtli = maiden, daughter
Horacio Carochi, S.J., Grammar of the Mexican language with an explanation of its adverbs (1645), translated and edited with commentary by James Lockhart, UCLA Latin American Studies Volume 89 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2001), 502.

Lockhart’s Nahuatl as Written: 

(i)chpōchtli. maiden, girl who has reached puberty, young unmarried woman. possessed, (grown) daughter. abs. pl. ichpōpōchtin. 219
James Lockhart, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Studies, 2001), 219.

Attestations from sources in English: 

iectli cioatl timalli cioatl, chipaoac, qualnezqui mimati, teconeuh, teichpuch haquequelli = The good woman [is] modest, pure, pleasing of appearance, honest. [She is] one's daughter [female speaking] --one's daughter [male speaking]. She is not the subject of ridicule. (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain; Book 10 -- The People, No. 14, Part 11, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. Dibble (Santa Fe and Salt Lake City: School of American Research and the University of Utah, 1961), 12.

In qualli yiollo ichpuchtli mocuiliani, motlaçotlani, mopiani, mopixqui, iecnemilice, qualnemilice, iollochipaoac, mopia, momaluia motlaçotla, hamo quequeloloani = The virtuous maiden [is] reserved, jealous of her virtue, chaste, continent, just, pious, pure of heart. She guards herself, guards her honor; she is jealous of her virtue; [she is] not to be ridiculed. (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain; Book 10 -- The People, No. 14, Part 11, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. Dibble (Santa Fe and Salt Lake City: School of American Research and the University of Utah, 1961), 12.

Auh ome oncate nochpochhua amo no tle vellonca quitozque iehica ca nonqua quintlamacatia yn intaƫin catca = And I have two daughters; they may say nothing either, because their late father has given them something separately. (Coyoacan 1548)
Rebecca Horn, Postconquest Coyoacan: Nahua-Spanish Relations in Central Mexico, 1519–1650 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997), 161, 319.

yoan in ie ichpupuchchicacti = and maidens recently matured (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain; Book 2 -- The Ceremonies, no. 14, Part III, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. Dibble (Santa Fe and Salt Lake City: School of American Research and the University of Utah, 1951), 87.

auh in cioa ichpopuchti, moxaoaia, mopotonjaia tlapaliujtica (auh in cioa ichpopuchti moxaoaia, mopotoniaia tlapuliuitica) = And the young women had painted their faces and were arrayed in red feathers
Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain; Book 2 -- The Ceremonies, no. 14, Part III, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. Dibble (Santa Fe and Salt Lake City: School of American Research and the University of Utah, 1951), 71.

auh in iehoantin ichpopuchti, cenca vel pialoia, ynjc aiac qujmjxeleuiz, ynjc aiac qujncamanalhuiz = And these girls were very well guarded, that none might covet them, nor ravish them
Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain; Book 2 -- The Ceremonies, no. 14, Part III, eds. and transl. Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. Dibble (Santa Fe and Salt Lake City: School of American Research and the University of Utah, 1951), 72.

niman quinmacaque imichpuchoan = then they gave them their daughters
James Lockhart, We People Here: Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico, Repertorium Columbianum v. 1 (Los Angeles: UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 1993), 92.

The word did not originally have the connotation of "virgin" -- it just meant adolescent girl or young woman.
Louise M. Burkhart, Holy Wednesday: A Nahua Drama from Early Colonial Mexico (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1996), 197.

nohipo = my daughter
(San Pablo Tepemaxalco, Toluca Valley, 1731)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 151.

Often used to speak about the Virgin Mary, usually with reverentials.
Robert Haskett and Stephanie Wood's notes from Nahuatl sessions with James Lockhart and subsequent research.

-chpoch = daughter (nochpoch, nopox, noxpos, nospo, etcentury) = my daughter; the final -ch was probably weakened to an -sh sound in speech, producing some of these variants ending in -x, -s, and so on
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 19.

-chpochton = little daughter (San Pablo Tepemaxalco, Toluca Valley, 1695)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 37.

nopos, nospos = my daughter (deviant spelling, San Luis, 1699) (Mexico, sixteenth-century)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 56.

nehual notoca Maria Micaela yxpocatl : prenSipala : yhuan CaSigue = I named Maria Micaela, unmarried woman, prinicpala and cacique. (San Pablo Tepemaxalco, Toluca Valley, 1762)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 140.

noxpochto = my little daughter (San Pedro Tototepec, Toluca Valley, 1733, 1695)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 146.

nohipo = my daughter
(San Pablo Tepemaxalco, Toluca Valley, 1731)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 151.

niman yc quinmamaltiaya y çeçeme ychpupuchti = then they had each of the maidens carry [the ears of maize] on their backs (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
Fray Bernardino de Sahagún, Primeros Memoriales, ed. Thelma D. Sullivan, et al. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), 58.

ichpuchtli / tzava / monequi. atezi. momachtia yq’tiliztlj = Maiden: it is required that she spin. She does not grind maize. She learns to weave. (central Mexico, sixteenth century)
Fray Bernardino de Sahagún, Primeros Memoriales, ed. Thelma D. Sullivan, et al. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997), 252.

yn tlaçotlanextzintli in mochpochxillantzinco = the precious light that is in your maidenly womb (early seventeenth century, Central Mexico)
Louise M. Burkhart, Before Guadalupe: The Virgin Mary in Early Colonial Nahuatl Literature, Institute for Mesoamerican Studies Monograph 13 (Albany: University at Albany, 2001), 55.

auh in iquac omotlacachiuili çan ie ichpuchtli = and when she had given birth, she was a maiden then (early seventeenth century, Central Mexico)
Louise M. Burkhart, Before Guadalupe: The Virgin Mary in Early Colonial Nahuatl Literature, Institute for Mesoamerican Studies Monograph 13 (Albany: University at Albany, 2001), 70.

in ye telpuchtli noma motetecomolhuia, anozo mitzpepetzinalhuia: auh in ye ichpuchtli, noma icoconeuh yetinemi, noma mozoquitlaxcalhuia = a young man [who] takes delight in digging holes with pieces of stone or painting himself up, or a young woman who still carries around her dolls and makes mud tortillas
Thelma D. Sullivan, "Nahuatl Proverbs, Conundrums, and Metaphors, Collected by Sahagún," Estudios de Cultura Náhuatl 4 (1963), 102–103.

Attestations from sources in Spanish: 

Sabado a XV de março de 1567 a[ñ]os yq[ua]c tianq[ui]zco tzatzivac in tlacalaquilli inic teq'[ui]tizque in telpochtli yn ichpochtli auh yn iq[ua]c omocac [Tachado: niman / auh yn] nima[n] cecentetl petiçio[n] mochiuh ynic tlacuepaloc [Entre renglones: ynauhca[n]paixti]. Auh yn amatl tianq[ui]zco q'[ui]pouhque yhua[n] tlaxilacalpa[n] mopouhtia yn inauhca[n]paixti etc. = Sábado a 15 de marzo de 1567 años, entonces en el mercado se pregonó el tributo, tributarán los jóvenes y las doncellas. Y cuando se escuchó, luego las cuatro parcialidades [nauhcampaixti] hicieron cada una, una petición para contradecirla. Y el documento fue leído en el mercado y se fue leyendo por los barrios [tlaxilacalli] de las cuatro parcialidades, etc. (ca. 1582, Mexico City)
Luis Reyes García, ¿Como te confundes? ¿Acaso no somos conquistados? Anales de Juan Bautista (Mexico: Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, Biblioteca Lorenzo Boturini Insigne y Nacional Basílica de Guadalupe, 2001), 168–169.

cihua:pil = ichpochtli
Tic ne co:jtan nemi se cua:huit uan ita:n nemi se gala:ntzin cihu:pil. = En el campo esta: un a:rbol y debajo esta: una bonita muchacha. (Sonsonate, El Salvador, Nahuat or Pipil, s. XX)
Tirso Canales, Nahuat (San Salvador: Universidad de El Salvador, Editorial Universitaria, 1996), 9–10.