cacique.

(a loanword from Spanish)

Headword: 
cacique.
Principal English Translation: 

a word used by Spaniards for an indigenous ruler; tlahtoani (a loanword from Spanish, and before that, from Taíno)
The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627), eds. James Lockhart, Frances Berdan, and Arthur J.O. Anderson (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1986), 153.

Attestations from sources in English: 

Cacica is what one would expect to see for a woman, although we know of one example where a woman from the Valley of Toluca calls herself a "principala yhuan cacique." (San Pablo Tepemaxalco, Toluca Valley, 1762)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 139–40.

Cacique "sometimes had its original meaning, referring to the head of a dynastic lineage and holder of its right, but more often it simply meant a person of considerable wealth with high standing in the indigenous community." (San Pablo Tepemaxalco, Toluca Valley, 1762)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 139–40.

nehual notoca Maria Micaela yxpocatl = prenSipala = yhuan CaSique = I named Maria Micaela, unmarried woman, principala and cacique. (San Pablo Tepemaxalco, Toluca Valley, 1762)
Caterina Pizzigoni, ed., Testaments of Toluca (Stanford: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications, 2007), 139–40.