A

Letter A: Displaying 241 - 260 of 2430
Orthographic Variants: 
acan oyeuati

something insufficient or lacking; someone to whom no one pays attention (see Molina)

something healthy and whole, without flaws (see Molina)

an antisocial person, not a friend to anyone; a person who cannot converse (see Molina)

Orthographic Variants: 
acan teneneuixca

something without parallel, without equal (see Molina)

Orthographic Variants: 
acan tetlaneui

something very like another thing, difficult to differentiate (see Molina)

ɑhkɑ:n

nowhere, no place (see Molina, Karttunen, Lockhart, etc.)

ɑːkɑnɑ

to settle a boat or pull it up on land; or, to winnow seeds using the wind (see Molina)

ɑːkɑpɑhtɬi
Orthographic Variants: 
ācapahtli

medicinal plant with radish-like leaves (see Karttunen)

ɑːkɑpetʃtɬi
Orthographic Variants: 
ācapechtli

reed mat (see Karttunen)

ɑːkɑpetɬɑtɬ

mat made of reeds or canes (see Molina and Karttune)

a stand of reeds (see Molina)

ɑːkɑpitsɑktɬi

a reed, or a type of cane (see Molina)

a woman's name; in the Historia Tolteca Chichimeca, she is mentioned as being a wife (zohuatl), apparently of an Olmec Xicalanca tlahtoani (sixteenth century, Quauhtinchan)
Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca, eds. Paul Kirchhoff, Lina Odena Güemes, y Luis Reyes García (México: CISINAH, INAH-SEP, 1976), 152.

Orthographic Variants: 
Acapolco

a port on the Pacific coast; the American end of the trans-Pacific trade carried by the Manila galleons (see attestations)

worried, preoccupied, disconcerted (see Molina)

ɑːkɑteki

to cut reeds

to support a maize plant so that it will grow (see Molina)

ɑːkɑtɬ
Orthographic Variants: 
ācatl, aca

a reed or cane; also, a calendrical marker, and a personal name; these reeds were made into darts and arrows; in hieroglyphs the acatl takes on a number of visual forms

reed grass

cane fields, cane plantation (see Molina)

a place name; place of reeds; a tlaxilacalli of Xoloco, a part of Mexico City (central Mexico, 1613)
Annals of His Time: Don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, James Lockhart, Susan Schroeder, and Doris Namala, eds. and transl. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006), 252–253.